CLEP Romantic Period (1830-1870) Literary Interpretation Practice Test >> Exam 1

Question 1 of 30
Date: 22/04/2019 21:57:19
Time Remaining :
1) "But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling‚Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door;Then‚ upon the velvet sinking‚ I betook myself to linkingFancy unto fancy‚ thinking what this ominous bird of yore?What this grim‚ ungainly‚ ghastly‚ gaunt‚ and ominous bird of yore Meant in croaking ?Nevermore.’. . . ?Prophet!’ said I‚ ?thing of evil!?prophet still‚ if bird or devil!By that Heaven that bends above us?by that God we both adore?Tell this soul with sorrow laden if‚ within the distant Aidenn‚It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore?Clasp a rare and radiant maiden‚ whom the angels named Lenore?’Quoth the raven‚ ?Nevermore.’?Be that word our sign of parting‚ bird or fiend!’ I shrieked upstarting??Get thee back into the tempest and the Night’s Plutonian shore!Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!Leave my loneliness unbroken!?quit the bust above my door!Take thy beak from out my heart‚ and take thy form from off my door!’Quoth the raven‚ ?Nevermore.’And the raven‚ never flitting‚ still is sitting‚ still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon’s that is dreaming‚And the lamp-light o’er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted?nevermore!Pallas‚ also called Athena‚ was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare. The student wonders if the raven is a messenger from the otherworld‚ bringing news of the speaker’s dear departed ____________________‚ When the raven perches on the bust of Athena."
Ans:
2) "This Narrative (1845) is authored by________ ‚ representative of the experiences of many slaves. The whisper that my master was my father‚ may or may not be true; and‚ true or false‚ it is of but little consequence to my purpose whilst the fact remains‚ in all its glaring odiousness‚ that slaveholders have ordained‚ and by law established‚ that the children of slave women shall in all cases follow the condition of their mothers; and this is done too obviously to administer to their own lusts‚ and make a gratification of their wicked desires profitable as well as pleasurable; for by this cunning arrangement‚ the slaveholder‚ in cases not a few‚ sustains to his slaves the double relation of master and father.I know of such cases; and it is worthy of remark that such slaves invariably suffer greater hardships‚ and have more to contend with‚ than others. They are‚ in the first place‚ a constant offence to their mistress. She is ever disposed to find fault with them; they can seldom do any thing to please her; she is never better pleased than when she sees them under the lash‚ especially when she suspects her husband of showing to his mulatto children favors which he withholds from his black slaves. The master is frequently compelled to sell this class of his slaves‚ out of deference to the feelings of his white wife; and‚ cruel as the deed may strike any one to be‚ for a man to sell his own children to human flesh-mongers‚ it is often the dictate of humanity for him to do so; for‚ unless he does this‚ he must not only whip them himself‚ but must stand by and see one white son tie up his brother‚ of but few shades darker complexion than himself‚ and ply the gory lash to his naked back; and if he lisp one word of disapproval‚ it is set down to his parental partiality‚ and only makes a bad matter worse‚ both for himself and the slave whom he would protect and defend."
3) "The prohibition of married women to do what? was protested by Women’s rights activists . (Click all that apply.)The history of mankind is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations on the part of man toward woman‚ . . . .Having deprived her of this first right of a citizen‚ the elective franchise‚ thereby leaving her without representation in the halls of legislation‚ he has oppressed her on all sides.He has made her‚ if married‚ in the eye of the law‚ civilly dead.He has taken from her all right in property‚ even to the wages she earns. . . .He has so framed the laws of divorce‚ . . . and in case of separation‚ to whom the guardianship of the children shall be given‚ as to be wholly regardless of the happiness of women?the law‚ in all cases‚ going upon a flase supposition of the supremacy of man‚ and giving all power into his hands. . . .He has denied her the facilities for obtaining a thorough education‚ all colleges being closed against her. . . .He has endeavored‚ in every way that he could‚ to destroy her confidence in her own powers‚ to lessen her self-respect‚ and to make her willing to lead a dependent and abject life.Now‚ in view of this entire disfranchisement of one-half the people of this country‚ their social and religious degradation?in view of the unjust laws above mentioned‚ and because women do feel themselves aggrieved‚ oppressed‚ and fraudulently deprived of their most sacred rights‚ we insist that they have immediate admission to all the rights and privileges which belong to them as citizens of the United States."
4) "The novel Life in the Iron-_________ (1861)‚ is referred in this excerpt.Nothing remains to tell that the poor Welsh puddler once lived‚ but this figure of the mill-woman cut in korl. I have it here in a corner of my library. I keep it hid behind a curtain‚?it is such a rough‚ ungainly thing. Yet there are about it touches‚ grand sweeps of outline‚ that show a master’s hand. Sometimes‚?to-night‚ for instance‚?the curtain is accidentally drawn back‚ and I see a bare arm stretched out imploringly in the darkness‚ and an eager‚ wolfish face watching mine: a wan‚ woeful face‚ through which the spirit of the dead korl-cutter looks out‚ with its thwarted life‚ its mighty hunger‚ its unfinished work. Its pale‚ vague lips seem to tremble with a terrible question. ?Is this the End?? they say‚??nothing beyond? no more?? Why‚ you tell me you have seen that look in the eyes of dumb brutes‚?horses dying under the lash. I know."
Ans:
5) " To which famous anti-slavery novel does this excerpt conclude to?To you‚ generous‚ noble-minded men and women‚ of the South‚?you‚ whose virtue‚ and magnanimity and purity of character‚ are the greater for the severer trial it has encountered‚? to you is her appeal. Have you not‚ in your own secret souls‚ in your own private conversings‚ felt that there are woes and evils‚ in this accursed system‚ far beyond what are here shadowed‚ or can be shadowed? Can it be otherwise? Is man ever a creature to be trusted with wholly irresponsible power? And does not the slave system‚ by denying the slave all legal right of testimony‚ make every individual owner an irresponsible despot? Can anybody fail to make the inference what the practical result will be? If there is‚ as we admit‚ a public sentiment among you‚ men of honor‚ justice and humanity‚ is there not also another kind of public sentiment among the ruffian‚ the brutal and debased? And cannot the ruffian‚ the brutal‚ the debased‚ by slave law‚ own just as many slaves as the best and purest? Are the honorable‚ the just‚ the high-minded and compassionate‚ the majority anywhere in this world?The slave-trade is now‚ by American law‚ considered as piracy. But a slave-trade‚ as systematic as ever was carried on . . . the coast of Africa‚ is . . . [a] result of American slavery. And its heart-break and its horrors‚ can they be told?The writer has given only a faint shadow‚ a dim picture‚ of the anguish and despair that are . . . shattering thousands of families . . . ."
6) "In this poem‚ ___________is personified .Because I could not stop for Death‚He kindly stopped for me;The carriage held but just ourselvesAnd Immortality. We slowly drove‚ he knew no haste‚5 And I had put away My labor‚ and my leisure too‚For his civility.We passed the school‚ where children strove At recess‚ in the ring; 10We passed the fields of gazing grain‚We passed the setting sun.Or rather‚ he passed us;The dews grew quivering and chill‚For only gossamer my gown‚ 15 My tippet only tulle.We paused before a house that seemed A swelling of the ground; The roof was scarcely visible‚The cornice but a mound. 20 Since then ?tis centuries‚ and yet each Feels shorter than the day I first surmised the horses’ heads Were toward eternity."
Ans:
7) "Which of the following characters are included in this work ? (Click all that apply.)?Thou wilt love her dearly‚? repeated Hester Prynne‚ as she and the minister sat watching little Pearl. ?Dost thou not think her beautiful? And see with what natural skill she has made those simple flowers adorn her! Had she gathered pearls‚ and diamonds‚ and rubies‚ in the wood‚ they could not have become her better. She is a splendid child! But I know whose brow she has!??Dost thou know‚ Hester‚? said Arthur Dimmesdale‚ with an unquiet smile‚ ?that this dear child‚ tripping about always at thy side‚ hath caused me many an alarm? Methought?O Hester‚ what a thought is that‚ and how terrible to dread it!?that my own features were partly repeated in her face‚ and so strikingly that the world might see them! But she is mostly thine!??No‚ no! Not mostly!? answered the mother with a tender smile. ?A little longer‚ and thou needest not to be afraid to trace whose child she is. But how strangely beautiful she looks‚ with those wild flowers in her hair! It is as if one of the fairies‚ whom we left in dear old England‚ had decked her out to meet us.?"
8) "The term ?Fort? is synonymous with________ ‚ In the section ?On Forts? in Artemus Ward‚ His Book (1862).Every man has got a Fort. It’s sum men’s fort to do one thing‚ and some other men’s fort to do another‚ while there is numeris shiftliss critters goin’ round loose whose fort is not to do nothin’.Shakspeer rote good plase‚ but he wouldn’t hav succeeded as a Washington correspondent of a New York daily paper. He lackt the rekesit fancy and immagginashun.That’s so! . . . . Twict I’ve endevered to do things which thay wasn’t my Fort. The fust time was when I undertuk to lick a owdashus cuss who cut a hole in my tent & krawld threw. Sez I‚ ?My jentle Sir‚ go out or I shall fall on to you putty hevy.? Sez he‚ ?Wade in‚ Old wax figgers‚? whereupon I went for him‚ but he cawt me powerful on the hed & knockt me threw the tent into a cow pastur. He pursood the attack & flung me into a mud puddle. As I arose & rung out my drencht garmints I koncluded fitin wasn’t my Fort."
9) "The title of this poem is_________ from Whitman’s Leaves of Grass .I celebrate myself‚ and sing myself‚ And what I assume you shall assume‚ For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you. I loafe and invite my soul‚ I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass. My tongue‚ every atom of my blood‚ form’d from this soil‚ this air‚ Born here of parents born here from parents the same‚ and their arents the same‚ I‚ now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin‚ Hoping to cease not till death. Creeds and schools in abeyance‚ Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are‚ but never forgotten‚ I harbor for good or bad‚ I permit to speak at every hazard‚ Nature without check with original energy."
10) "This essay was written by ________? I heartily accept the motto‚??That government is best which governs least?; . . . . Carried out‚ it finally amounts to this‚ which also I believe‚??That government is best which governs not at all?; and when men are prepared for it‚ that will be the kind of government . . . they will have. Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually‚ and all governments are sometimes‚ inexpedient. The objections which have been brought against a standing army . . . may also . . . be brought against a standing government. The standing army is only an arm of the standing government. The government itself‚ which is only the mode which the people have chosen to execute their will‚ is equally liable to be abused and perverted before the people can act through it. . . .This American government?what is it but a tradition‚ though a recent one‚ endeavoring to transmit itself unimpaired to posterity‚ but each instant losing some of its integrity? . . . . Governments show thus how successfully men can be imposed on‚ even impose on themselves‚ for their own advantage. It is excellent‚ we must all allow. Yet this government never of itself furthered any enterprise‚ but by the alacrity with which it got out of its way. It does not keep the country free. It does not settle the West. It does not educate. The character inherent in the American people has done all that has been accomplished; and it would have done somewhat more‚ if the government had not sometimes got in its way."
11) " The concept of__________ ‚ which became a staple facet of American identity was promoted from ?Self-Reliance? (1841). There is a time in every man’s education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance; that imitation is suicide; that he must take himself for better‚ for worse‚ as his portion; that though the wide universe is full of good‚ no kernel of nourishing corn can come to him but through his toil bestowed on that plot of ground which is . . . [his] to till. The power which resides in him is new in nature‚ and none but he knows what that is which he can do‚ nor does he know until he has tried. Not for nothing one face‚ one character‚ one fact‚ makes much impression on him‚ and another none. This sculpture in the memory is not without preestablished harmony. The eye was placed where one ray should fall‚ that it might testify of that particular ray. . . .Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string. Accept the place the divine providence has found for you‚ the society of your contemporaries‚ the connection of events. Great men have always done so‚ and confided themselves childlike to the genius of their age‚ betraying their perception that the absolutely trustworthy was seated at their heart‚ working through their hands‚ predominating in all their being. And we are now men‚ and must accept in the highest mind the same transcendent destiny; . . . not minors . . . in a protected corner‚ not cowards fleeing before a revolution‚ but guides‚ redeemers‚ and benefactors‚ obeying the Almighty effort‚ and advancing on Chaos and the Dark."
12) " ?The Big_________ of Arkansas? (1841) is the most famous short story by the humorist Thomas Bangs Thorpe.?I raised myself‚ took deliberate aim‚ and fired. Instantly the varmint wheeled‚ gave a yell‚ and walked through the fence‚ as easy as a falling tree would through a cobweb. ?I started after‚ but was tripped up by my inexpressibles‚ which‚ either from habit or the excitement of the moment‚ were about my heels‚ and before I had really gathered myself up‚ I heard the old varmint groaning‚ like a thousand sinners‚ in a thicket near by‚ and‚ by the time I reached him‚ he was a corpse. ?Stranger‚ it took five niggers and myself to put that carcass on a mule’s back‚ and old long-ears waddled under his load‚ as if he was foundered in every leg of his body; and with a common whopper of a bear‚ he would have trotted off‚ and enjoyed himself.??Twould astonish you to know how big he was: I made a bedspread of his skin‚ and the way it used to cover my bear mattress‚ and leave several feet on each side to tuck up‚ would have delighted you. It was‚ in fact‚ a creation bear‚ and if it had lived in Samson’s time‚ and had met him in a fair fight‚ he would have licked him in the twinkling of a dice-box.?"
Ans:
13) " The scribe Bartleby repeats what phrase when asked to do anything other than copy documents? In Herman Melville’s ?Bartleby the Scrivener? (1853).Now my original business?that of a conveyancer and title hunter‚ and drawer-up of recondite documents of all sorts?was considerably increased by receiving the master’s office. There was now great work for scriveners. Not only must I push the clerks already with me‚ but I must have additional help. In answer to my advertisement‚ a motionless young man one morning‚ stood upon my office threshold‚ the door being open‚ for it was summer. I can see that figure now?pallidly neat‚ pitiably respectable‚ incurably forlorn! It was Bartleby. . . . At first Bartleby did an extraordinary quantity of writing. As if long famishing for something to copy‚ he seemed to gorge himself on my documents. There was no pause for digestion. He ran a day and night line‚ copying by sun-light and by candle-light. I should have been quite delighted with his application‚ had been cheerfully industrious. But he wrote on silently‚ palely‚ mechanically. It is‚ of course‚ an indispensable part of a scrivener’s business to verify the accuracy of his copy‚ word by word. Where there are two or more scriveners in an office‚ they assist each other in this examination‚ one reading from the copy‚ the other holding the original. It is a very dull‚ wearisome‚ and lethargic affair. . . .Nothing so aggravates an earnest person as a passive resistance. . . . The passiveness of Bartleby sometimes irritated me."
14) "?Stouter hearts than a woman’s have quailed in this terrible winter.Yours is tender and trusting‚ and needs a stronger to lean on;So I have come to you now‚ with an offer and proffer of marriage Made by a good man and true‚ Miles Standish the Captain of Plymouth!" Thus he delivered his message‚ the dexterous writer of letters‚?Did not embellish the theme‚ nor array it in beautiful phrases‚But came straight to the point‚ and blurted it out like a schoolboy;Even the Captain himself could hardly have said it more bluntly.Mute with amazement and sorrow‚ Priscilla the Puritan maidenLooked into Alden’s face‚ her eyes dilated with wonder‚Feeling his words like a blow‚ that stunned her and rendered her speechless;Till at length she exclaimed‚ interrupting the ominous silence:"If the great Captain of Plymouth is so very eager to wed me‚Why does he not come himself‚ and take the trouble to woo me?If I am not worth the wooing‚ I surely am not worth the winning!"Then John Alden began explaining and smoothing the matter‚Making it worse as he went‚ by saying the Captain was busy‚?Had no time for such things;?such things! the words grating harshly Fell on the ear of Priscilla; and swift as a flash she made answer:In the epic poem The Courtship of Miles Standish (1858) by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow ‚ which of the following are the characters ?(Check all that apply.)"
15) "The___________ of the American people accomplished all changes‚ according to Thoreau’s essay.I heartily accept the motto‚??That government is best which governs least?; . . . . Carried out‚ it finally amounts to this‚ which also I believe‚??That government is best which governs not at all?; and when men are prepared for it‚ that will be the kind of government . . . they will have. Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually‚ and all governments are sometimes‚ inexpedient. The objections which have been brought against a standing army . . . may also . . . be brought against a standing government. The standing army is only an arm of the standing government. The government itself‚ which is only the mode which the people have chosen to execute their will‚ is equally liable to be abused and perverted before the people can act through it. . . .This American government?what is it but a tradition‚ though a recent one‚ endeavoring to transmit itself unimpaired to posterity‚ but each instant losing some of its integrity? . . . . Governments show thus how successfully men can be imposed on‚ even impose on themselves‚ for their own advantage. It is excellent‚ we must all allow. Yet this government never of itself furthered any enterprise‚ but by the alacrity with which it got out of its way. It does not keep the country free. It does not settle the West. It does not educate. The character inherent in the American people has done all that has been accomplished; and it would have done somewhat more‚ if the government had not sometimes got in its way."
Ans:
16) "Reader‚ my story ends with freedom; not in the usual way‚ with marriage. I and my children are now free! We are as free from the power of slaveholders as are the white people of the north; and though that‚ according to my ideas‚ is not saying a great deal‚ it is a vast improvement in my condition. The dream of my life is not yet realized. I do not sit with my children in a home of my own. I still long for a hearthstone of my own‚ however humble. I wish it for my children’s sake far more than for my own. But God so orders circumstances as to keep me with my friend Mrs. Bruce. Love‚ duty‚ gratitude‚ also bind me to her side. It is a privilege to serve her who pities my oppressed people‚ and who has bestowed the inestimable boon of freedom on me and my children. It has been painful to me‚ in many ways‚ to recall the dreary years I passed in bondage. I would gladly forget them if I could. Yet the retrospection is not altogether without solace; for with those gloomy recollections come tender memories of my good old grandmother‚ like light‚ fleecy clouds floating over a dark and troubled sea. The slave__________ Jacobs‚ under threat of sexual harassment by her master‚ who writes this true narrative under the pseudonym Linda Brent‚ took a white lover and had two children by him. It wasn’t until the end of her narrative that Harriet’s freedom was purchased and the freedom of her children secured‚ despite several attempts."
Ans:
17) "What is the name of this document by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott?The history of mankind is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations on the part of man toward woman‚ . . . .Having deprived her of this first right of a citizen‚ the elective franchise‚ thereby leaving her without representation in the halls of legislation‚ he has oppressed her on all sides.He has made her‚ if married‚ in the eye of the law‚ civilly dead.He has taken from her all right in property‚ even to the wages she earns. . . .He has so framed the laws of divorce‚ . . . and in case of separation‚ to whom the guardianship of the children shall be given‚ as to be wholly regardless of the happiness of women?the law‚ in all cases‚ going upon a flase supposition of the supremacy of man‚ and giving all power into his hands. . . .He has denied her the facilities for obtaining a thorough education‚ all colleges being closed against her. . . .He has endeavored‚ in every way that he could‚ to destroy her confidence in her own powers‚ to lessen her self-respect‚ and to make her willing to lead a dependent and abject life.Now‚ in view of this entire disfranchisement of one-half the people of this country‚ their social and religious degradation?in view of the unjust laws above mentioned‚ and because women do feel themselves aggrieved‚ oppressed‚ and fraudulently deprived of their most sacred rights‚ we insist that they have immediate admission to all the rights and privileges which belong to them as citizens of the United States."
18) "The author of this lengthy poem is _________________.I celebrate myself‚ and sing myself‚ And what I assume you shall assume‚ For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you. I loafe and invite my soul‚ I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass. My tongue‚ every atom of my blood‚ form’d from this soil‚ this air‚ Born here of parents born here from parents the same‚ and their parents the same‚ I‚ now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin‚ Hoping to cease not till death. Creeds and schools in abeyance‚ Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are‚ but never forgotten‚ I harbor for good or bad‚ I permit to speak at every hazard‚ Nature without check with original energy."
Ans:
19) "The speaker in this section is _______ _______.?Stouter hearts than a woman’s have quailed in this terrible winter.Yours is tender and trusting‚ and needs a stronger to lean on;So I have come to you now‚ with an offer and proffer of marriage Made by a good man and true‚ Miles Standish the Captain of Plymouth!" Thus he delivered his message‚ the dexterous writer of letters‚?Did not embellish the theme‚ nor array it in beautiful phrases‚But came straight to the point‚ and blurted it out like a schoolboy;Even the Captain himself could hardly have said it more bluntly.Mute with amazement and sorrow‚ Priscilla the Puritan maiden Looked into Alden’s face‚ her eyes dilated with wonder‚Feeling his words like a blow‚ that stunned her and rendered her speechless;Till at length she exclaimed‚ interrupting the ominous silence:"If the great Captain of Plymouth is so very eager to wed me‚Why does he not come himself‚ and take the trouble to woo me?If I am not worth the wooing‚ I surely am not worth the winning!"Then John Alden began explaining and smoothing the matter‚Making it worse as he went‚ by saying the Captain was busy‚?Had no time for such things;?such things! the words grating harshly Fell on the ear of Priscilla; and swift as a flash she made answer:"
Ans:
20) "Upon my entrance‚ Usher arose from a sofa on which he had been lying at full length‚ and greeted me with a vivacious warmth which had much in it‚ I at first thought‚ of an overdone cordiality . . . .To an anomalous species of terror I found him a bounden slave. ?I shall perish‚? said he‚ ?I must perish in this deplorable folly. . . . In this unnerved?in this pitiable condition?I feel that the period will sooner or later arrive when I must abandon life and reason together‚ in some struggle with the grim phantasm‚ FEAR.? . . . . He admitted‚ however‚ although with hesitation‚ that much of the peculiar gloom which thus afflicted him could be traced to a more natural and far more palpable origin?to the severe and long-continued illness?indeed to the evidently approaching dissolution?of a tenderly beloved sister?his sole companion for long years?his last and only relative on earth. ?Her decease‚? he said‚ with a bitterness which I can never forget‚ ?would leave him (him the hopeless and the frail) the last of the ancient race of the Ushers.? While he spoke‚ the lady Madeline (for so was she called) passed slowly through a remote portion of the apartment‚ and‚ without having noticed my presence‚ disappeared. . . . the brother. . . had buried his face in his hands‚ and I could only perceive that a far more than ordinary wanness had overspread the emaciated fingers through which trickled many passionate tears.The main character‚ Roderick Usher‚ is distinguished by his melancholy mood caused by his hypochondriaism‚ mental deterioration‚ and the waning health of his only remaining relative‚ his sister. This short story by Edgar Allan Poe is titled ?The Fall of the House of________ ? (1839). "
Ans:
21) "This poem was written by_____ ‚ about a wagon that was built to last for 100 years without repairs .FIRST OF NOVEMBER‚ ? the Earthquake-day‚ ?79There are traces of age in the one-hoss shay‚A general flavor of mild decay‚But nothing local‚ as one may say.There couldn’t be‚ ? for the Deacon’s art Had made it so like in every part84 That there wasn’t a chance for one to start.For the wheels were just as strong as the thills And the floor was just as strong as the sills‚And the panels just as strong as the floor‚ And the whippletree neither less or more‚ 89 And the back-crossbar as strong as the fore‚And the spring and axle and hub encore.And yet‚ as a whole‚ it is past a doubt In another hour it will be worn out!First of November‚ fifty-five! 94 This morning the parson takes a drive.Now‚ small boys get out of the way! Here comes the wonderful one-hoss shay‚Drawn by a rat-tailed‚ ewe-necked bay."Huddup!" said the parson. ? Off went they. 99The parson was working his Sunday’s text‚?Had got to fifthly‚ and stopped perplexed At what the?Moses?was coming next.All at once the horse stood still‚Close by the meet’n’-house on the hill. 104First a shiver‚ and then a thrill‚Then something decidedly like a spill‚?And the parson was sitting upon a rock‚At half past nine by the meet’n’-house clock‚?Just the hour of the earthquake shock! 109 What do you think the parson found‚When he got up and stared around?The poor old chaise in a heap or mound‚As if it had been to the mill and ground!You see‚ of course‚ if you’re not a dunce‚ 114How it went to pieces all at once‚?All at once‚ and nothing first‚?Just as bubbles do when they burst.End of the wonderful one-hoss shay.Logic is logic. That’s all I say. 119"
22) "And what if‚ mad with wrongs themselves have wrought‚In their own treachery caught‚By their own fears made bold‚And leagued with him of old‚Who long since in the limits of the North Set up his evil throne‚ and warred with God?What if‚ both mad and blinded in their rage‚Our foes should fling us down their mortal gage‚And with a hostile step profane our sod!We shall not shrink‚ my brothers‚ but go forthTo meet them‚ marshaled by the Lord of Hosts‚And overshadowed by the mighty ghosts Of Moultrie and of Eutaw?who shall foil Auxiliars such as these? Nor these alone‚But every stock and stone Shall help us; but the very soil‚And all the generous wealth it gives to toil‚And all for which we love our noble land‚Shall fight beside‚ and through us; sea and strand‚The heart of woman‚ and her hand‚Tree‚ fruit‚ and flower‚ and every influence‚Gentle‚ or grave‚ or grand;The winds in our defence Shall seem to blow; to us the hills shall lend Their firmness and their calm;And in our stiffened sinews we shall blend The strength of pine and palm!Henry Timrod‚ celebrates the ?new? nation‚ the Confederate States of America‚ considered by many to be his best poem‚ in ?________? the ?poet laureate of the Confederacy? ."
Ans:
23) " ________ is the author of this poem.By the rude bridge that arched the flood‚Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled‚Here once the embattled farmers stood‚And fired the shot heard round the world‚The foe long since in silence slept‚ 5 Alike the Conqueror silent sleeps‚And Time the ruined bridge has swept Down the dark stream which seaward creeps.On this green bank‚ by this soft stream‚We set to-day a votive stone‚ 10 That memory may their deed redeem‚When like our sires our sons are gone.Spirit! who made those freemen dare To die‚ or leave their children free‚Bid time and nature gently spare 15 The shaft we raise to them and Thee."
Ans:
24) "___________ has written this poem.Because I could not stop for Death‚He kindly stopped for me;The carriage held but just ourselves And Immortality. We slowly drove‚ he knew no haste‚5And I had put away My labor‚ and my leisure too‚For his civility.We passed the school‚ where children strove At recess‚ in the ring; 10 We passed the fields of gazing grain‚ We passed the setting sun. Or rather‚ he passed us; The dews grew quivering and chill‚For only gossamer my gown‚ 15 My tippet only tulle. We paused before a house that seemed A swelling of the ground;The roof was scarcely visible‚The cornice but a mound. 20 Since then ?tis centuries‚ and yet each Feels shorter than the day I first surmised the horses’ heads Were toward eternity."
Ans:
25) "Which of the following qualities is demonstrated by Bartleby ? (Click all that apply.)Now my original business?that of a conveyancer and title hunter‚ and drawer-up of recondite documents of all sorts?was considerably increased by receiving the master’s office. There was now great work for scriveners. Not only must I push the clerks already with me‚ but I must have additional help. In answer to my advertisement‚ a motionless young man one morning‚ stood upon my office threshold‚ the door being open‚ for it was summer. I can see that figure now?pallidly neat‚ pitiably respectable‚ incurably forlorn! It was Bartleby. . . .At first Bartleby did an extraordinary quantity of writing. As if long famishing for something to copy‚ he seemed to gorge himself on my documents. There was no pause for digestion. He ran a day and night line‚ copying by sun-light and by candle-light. I should have been quite delighted with his application‚ had been cheerfully industrious. But he wrote on silently‚ palely‚ mechanically. It is‚ of course‚ an indispensable part of a scrivener’s business to verify the accuracy of his copy‚ word by word. Where there are two or more scriveners in an office‚ they assist each other in this examination‚ one reading from the copy‚ the other holding the original. It is a very dull‚ wearisome‚ and lethargic affair. . . .Nothing so aggravates an earnest person as a passive resistance. . . . The passiveness of Bartleby sometimes irritated me."
26) "What is Priscilla’s response upon hearing John’s message??Stouter hearts than a woman’s have quailed in this terrible winter.Yours is tender and trusting‚ and needs a stronger to lean on;So I have come to you now‚ with an offer and proffer of marriage Made by a good man and true‚ Miles Standish the Captain of Plymouth!" Thus he delivered his message‚ the dexterous writer of letters‚?Did not embellish the theme‚ nor array it in beautiful phrases‚But came straight to the point‚ and blurted it out like a schoolboy;Even the Captain himself could hardly have said it more bluntly.Mute with amazement and sorrow‚ Priscilla the Puritan maiden Looked into Alden’s face‚ her eyes dilated with wonder‚ Feeling his words like a blow‚ that stunned her and rendered her speechless;Till at length she exclaimed‚ interrupting the ominous silence:"If the great Captain of Plymouth is so very eager to wed me‚Why does he not come himself‚ and take the trouble to woo me?If I am not worth the wooing‚ I surely am not worth the winning!"Then John Alden began explaining and smoothing the matter‚Making it worse as he went‚ by saying the Captain was busy‚?Had no time for such things;?such things! the words grating harshly Fell on the ear of Priscilla; and swift as a flash she made answer:"
27) "From what romance is this excerpt taken? ?Thou wilt love her dearly‚? repeated Hester Prynne‚ as she and the minister sat watching little Pearl. ?Dost thou not think her beautiful? And see with what natural skill she has made those simple flowers adorn her! Had she gathered pearls‚ and diamonds‚ and rubies‚ in the wood‚ they could not have become her better. She is a splendid child! But I know whose brow she has!??Dost thou know‚ Hester‚? said Arthur Dimmesdale‚ with an unquiet smile‚ ?that this dear child‚ tripping about always at thy side‚ hath caused me many an alarm? Methought?O Hester‚ what a thought is that‚ and how terrible to dread it!?that my own features were partly repeated in her face‚ and so strikingly that the world might see them! But she is mostly thine!??No‚ no! Not mostly!? answered the mother with a tender smile. ?A little longer‚ and thou needest not to be afraid to trace whose child she is. But how strangely beautiful she looks‚ with those wild flowers in her hair! It is as if one of the fairies‚ whom we left in dear old England‚ had decked her out to meet us.?"

All form fields are required.

Name :

Email :