CLEP Realism and Naturalism Period (1870-1910) Prose Analysis, continued/Literary Interpretation Part 2 Practice Test >> Exam 1

Question 1 of 30
Date: 18/01/2019 22:30:21
Time Remaining :
1) "Some of Edna’s ?awakenings? are ? (Click all that apply.)Mr. Pontellier finally lit a cigar and began to smoke‚ . . . . He fixed his gaze upon a white sunshade that was advancing at snail’s pace from the beach. . . . Beneath its pink-lined shelter were his wife‚ Mrs. Pontellier‚ and young Robert Lebrun. When they reached the cottage‚ the two seated themselves with some appearance of fatigue upon the upper step of the porch‚ facing each other‚ each leaning against a supporting post. ?What folly! to bathe at such an hour in such heat!? exclaimed Mr. Pontellier. He himself had taken a plunge at daylight. That was why the morning seemed long to him. ?You are burnt beyond recognition‚? he added‚ looking at his wife as one looks at a valuable piece of personal property which has suffered some damage. She held up her hands‚ strong‚ shapely hands‚ and surveyed them critically‚ drawing up her fawn sleeves above the wrists. Looking at them reminded her of her rings‚ which she had given to her husband before leaving for the beach. She silently reached out to him‚ and he‚ understanding‚ took the rings from his vest pocket and dropped them into her open palm. She slipped them upon her fingers; then clasping her knees‚ she looked across at Robert and began to laugh. The rings sparkled upon her fingers. He sent back an answering smile. . . . Mr. Pontellier. . . yawned and . . . [went] over to Klein’s hotel and play a game of billiards. ?Come go along‚ Lebrun‚? he proposed to Robert. But Robert admitted quite frankly that he preferred to stay where he was and talk to Mrs. Pontellier."
2) "The character Huckleberry Finn is used in which other book of Samuel Clemens?Well‚ I catched my breath and most fainted. Shut up on a wreck with such a gang as that! But it warn’t no time to be sentimentering. . . . No sign of a boat. Jim said he didn’t believe he could go any further?so scared he hadn’t hardly any strength left‚ he said. But I said‚ come on‚ if we get left on this wreck we are in a fix‚ sure. So on we prowled again. We struck for the stern of the Texas‚ and found it‚ and then scrabbled along forwards on the skylight‚ hanging on from shutter to shutter‚ for the edge of the skylight was in the water. When we got pretty close to the cross-hall door there was the skiff‚ sure enough! I could just barely see her. I felt ever so thankful. In another second I would a been aboard of her‚ but just then the door opened. One of the men stuck his head out only about a couple of foot from me‚ and I thought I was gone . . . .Then Jim manned the oars‚ and we took out after our raft. Now was the first time that I begun to worry about the men?I reckon I hadn’t had time to before. I begun to think how dreadful it was‚ even for murderers‚ to be in such a fix. I says to myself‚ there ain’t no telling but I might come to be a murderer myself yet‚ and then how would I like it?"
3) " In Daisy Miller (1879)‚ which are the characters ? (Check all that apply.)"I should like very much to know your name‚" said Winterbourne."Her name is Daisy Miller!" cried the child. "But that isn’t her real name; that isn’t her name on her cards.""It’s a pity you haven’t got one of my cards!" said Miss Miller."Her real name is Annie P. Miller‚" the boy went on. . . ."My father’s name is Ezra B. Miller‚" he announced. "My father ain’t in Europe; my father’s in a better place than Europe."Winterbourne imagined for a moment that this was the manner in which the child had been taught to intimate that Mr. Miller had been removed to the sphere of celestial reward. But Randolph immediately added‚ "My father’s in Schenectady. He’s got a big business. My father’s rich‚ you bet!" . . . ."Mother’s going to get a teacher for him as soon as we get to Italy. Can you get good teachers in Italy?""Very good‚ I should think‚" said Winterbourne."Or else she’s going to find some school. He ought to learn some more. He’s only nine. He’s going to college." And in this way Miss Miller continued to converse upon the affairs of her family and upon other topics. She sat there with her extremely pretty hands‚ ornamented with very brilliant rings‚ folded in her lap‚ and with her pretty eyes now resting upon those of Winterbourne‚ now wandering over the garden‚ the people who passed by‚ and the beautiful view. She talked to Winterbourne as if she had known him a long time. He found it very pleasant."
4) "__________ of African-Americans living in the post-Civil War United States is highlighted in this excerpt.I have called my tiny community a world‚ and so its isolation made it; and yet there was among us but a half-awakened common consciousness‚ sprung from common joy and grief‚ at burial‚ birth‚ or wedding; from a common hardship in poverty‚ poor land‚ and low wages; and‚ above all‚ from the sight of the Veil that hung between us and Opportunity. All this caused us to think some thoughts to-gether; but these‚ when ripe for speech‚ were spoken in various languages. Those whose eyes twenty-five and more years before had seen ?the glory of the coming of the Lord‚? saw in every present hindrance or help a dark fatalism bound to bring all things right in His own good time. The mass of those to whom slavery was a dim recollection of childhood found the world a puzzling thing: it asked little of them‚ and they answered with little‚ and yet it ridiculed their offering. Such a paradox they could not understand‚ and therefore sank into listless indifference‚ or shiftlessness‚ or reckless bravado."
5) "What is the setting of this excerpt below? Mr. Pontellier finally lit a cigar and began to smoke‚ . . . . He fixed his gaze upon a white sunshade that was advancing at snail’s pace from the beach. . . . Beneath its pink-lined shelter were his wife‚ Mrs. Pontellier‚ and young Robert Lebrun. When they reached the cottage‚ the two seated themselves with some appearance of fatigue upon the upper step of the porch‚ facing each other‚ each leaning against a supporting post. ?What folly! to bathe at such an hour in such heat!? exclaimed Mr. Pontellier. He himself had taken a plunge at daylight. That was why the morning seemed long to him. ?You are burnt beyond recognition‚? he added‚ looking at his wife as one looks at a valuable piece of personal property which has suffered some damage. She held up her hands‚ strong‚ shapely hands‚ and surveyed them critically‚ drawing up her fawn sleeves above the wrists. Looking at them reminded her of her rings‚ which she had given to her husband before leaving for the beach. She silently reached out to him‚ and he‚ understanding‚ took the rings from his vest pocket and dropped them into her open palm. She slipped them upon her fingers; then clasping her knees‚ she looked across at Robert and began to laugh. The rings sparkled upon her fingers. He sent back an answering smile. . . . Mr. Pontellier. . . yawned and . . . [went] over to Klein’s hotel and play a game of billiards. ?Come go along‚ Lebrun‚? he proposed to Robert. But Robert admitted quite frankly that he preferred to stay where he was and talk to Mrs. Pontellier."
6) "What is Trina’s ?avarice?? But McTeague never became a drunkard in the generally received sense of the term. He did not drink to excess more than two or three times in a month‚ and never upon any occasion did he become maudlin or staggering. Perhaps his nerves were naturally too dull to admit of any excitation; perhaps he did not really care for the whiskey‚ and only drank because Heise and the other men at Frenna’s did. Trina could often reproach him with drinking too much; she never could say that he was drunk. The alcohol had its effect for all that. It roused the man‚ or rather the brute in the man‚ and now not only roused it‚ but goaded it to evil. McTeague’s nature changed. It was not only the alcohol‚ it was idleness and a general throwing off of the good influence his wife had had over him in the days of their prosperity. McTeague disliked Trina. She was a perpetual irritation to him. She annoyed him because she was so small‚ so prettily made‚ so invariably correct and precise. Her avarice incessantly harassed him. Her industry was a constant reproach to him. She seemed to flaunt her work defiantly in his face. It was the red flag in the eyes of the bull."
7) "Well‚ I catched my breath and most fainted. Shut up on a wreck with such a gang as that! But it warn’t no time to be sentimentering. . . . No sign of a boat. Jim said he didn’t believe he could go any further?so scared he hadn’t hardly any strength left‚ he said. But I said‚ come on‚ if we get left on this wreck we are in a fix‚ sure. So on we prowled again. We struck for the stern of the Texas‚ and found it‚ and then scrabbled along forwards on the skylight‚ hanging on from shutter to shutter‚ for the edge of the skylight was in the water. When we got pretty close to the cross-hall door there was the skiff‚ sure enough! I could just barely see her. I felt ever so thankful. In another second I would a been aboard of her‚ but just then the door opened. One of the men stuck his head out only about a couple of foot from me‚ and I thought I was gone . . . .Then Jim manned the oars‚ and we took out after our raft. Now was the first time that I begun to worry about the men?I reckon I hadn’t had time to before. I begun to think how dreadful it was‚ even for murderers‚ to be in such a fix. I says to myself‚ there ain’t no telling but I might come to be a murderer myself yet‚ and then how would I like it?They steal the robbers’_______ and escape‚ when Huck and Jim discover that their raft has floated away. Later‚ Huck feels bad for leaving the robbers no way to get off the steamboat‚ so he finds a ferry watchman and concocts an elaborate story about his fictitious family being stranded on the wrecked boat‚ so the watchman will investigate and find the robbers."
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8) "This entanglement made Carrie anxious for a change of some sort. Hurstwood did not seem to realise that she had a right to anything. He schemed to make what she earned cover all expenses‚ but seemed not to trouble over adding anything himself.?He talks about worrying‚? thought Carrie. ?If he worried enough he couldn’t sit there and wait for me. He’d get something to do. No man could go seven months without finding something if he tried.?The sight of him always around in his untidy clothes and gloomy appearance drove Carrie to seek relief in other places. Twice a week there were matinees‚ and then Hurstwood ate a cold snack‚ which he prepared himself. Two other days there were rehearsals beginning at ten in the morning and lasting usually until one. Now‚ to this Carrie added a few visits to one or two chorus girls‚ including the blue-eyed soldier of the golden helmet. She did it because it was pleasant and a relief from dulness of the home over which her husband brooded. The novel Sister______ (1900)‚ was considered controversial in its day for its portrayal of the coarser side of American life (not the gentility)‚ and for its frank display of immorality with little or no regret or consequences. This is Dreiser’s first novel."
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9) "Below is the story excerpted ‚ which of the following are characters in this story? (Click all that apply.)This entanglement made Carrie anxious for a change of some sort. Hurstwood did not seem to realise that she had a right to anything. He schemed to make what she earned cover all expenses‚ but seemed not to trouble over adding anything himself.?He talks about worrying‚? thought Carrie. ?If he worried enough he couldn’t sit there and wait for me. He’d get something to do. No man could go seven months without finding something if he tried.?The sight of him always around in his untidy clothes and gloomy appearance drove Carrie to seek relief in other places. Twice a week there were matinees‚ and then Hurstwood ate a cold snack‚ which he prepared himself. Two other days there were rehearsals beginning at ten in the morning and lasting usually until one. Now‚ to this Carrie added a few visits to one or two chorus girls‚ including the blue-eyed soldier of the golden helmet. She did it because it was pleasant and a relief from dulness of the home over which her husband brooded."
10) "Buck did not read the newspapers‚ or he would have known that trouble was brewing‚ not alone for himself‚ but for every tide-water dog‚ strong of muscle and with warm‚ long hair‚ from Puget Sound to San Diego. Because men‚ groping in the Arctic darkness‚ had found a yellow metal‚ and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the find‚ thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted dogs‚ and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs‚ with strong muscles by which to toil‚ and furry coats to protect them from the frost. The classic________ Jack London portrayed a bleak‚ rugged existence among nature‚ with socialistic themes of ?the survival of the fittest‚? or with evolutionary themes of regression to earlier stages‚ Influenced by Herbert Spencer‚ Charles Darwin‚ Karl Marx‚ and Friedrich Nietzsche. London’s writings also contrasted chaotic urban settings with the rustic and the exotic."
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11) "What does ?the glory of the coming of the Lord? refer to? In this excerpt of a book by W.E.B. DuBois.I have called my tiny community a world‚ and so its isolation made it; and yet there was among us but a half-awakened common consciousness‚ sprung from common joy and grief‚ at burial‚ birth‚ or wedding; from a common hardship in poverty‚ poor land‚ and low wages; and‚ above all‚ from the sight of the Veil that hung between us and Opportunity. All this caused us to think some thoughts to-gether; but these‚ when ripe for speech‚ were spoken in various languages. Those whose eyes twenty-five and more years before had seen ?the glory of the coming of the Lord‚? saw in every present hindrance or help a dark fatalism bound to bring all things right in His own good time. The mass of those to whom slavery was a dim recollection of childhood found the world a puzzling thing: it asked little of them‚ and they answered with little‚ and yet it ridiculed their offering. Such a paradox they could not understand‚ and therefore sank into listless indifference‚ or shiftlessness‚ or reckless bravado."
12) "What was Silas Lapham’s business??I don’t care to say it to his face‚?I don’t like the principle‚?but since you ask me about it‚ I’d just as lief say that I’ve never had any young man take hold here equal to your son. I don’t know as you care.??You make me very happy‚? said Bromfield Corey. ?Very happy indeed. I’ve always had the idea that there was something in my son‚ if he could only find the way to work it out. And he seems to have gone into your business for the love of it.??He went to work in the right way‚ sir! He told me about it. He looked into it. And that paint is a thing that will bear looking into.??Oh yes. You might think he had invented it‚ if you heard him celebrating it.??Is that so?? demanded Lapham‚ pleased through and through. ?Well‚ there ain’t any other way. You’ve got to believe in a thing before you can put any heart in it. Why‚ I had a partner in this thing once‚ along back just after the war‚ and he used to be always wanting to tinker with something else. ?Why‚’ says I‚ ?you’ve got the best thing in God’s universe now. Why ain’t you satisfied?’ I had to get rid of him at last. . . . No‚ sir‚ you’ve got to believe in a thing. And I believe in your son. And I don’t mind telling you that‚ so far as he’s gone‚ he’s a success.?"
13) "Mr. Pontellier finally lit a cigar and began to smoke‚ . . . . He fixed his gaze upon a white sunshade that was advancing at snail’s pace from the beach. . . . Beneath its pink-lined shelter were his wife‚ Mrs. Pontellier‚ and young Robert Lebrun. When they reached the cottage‚ the two seated themselves with some appearance of fatigue upon the upper step of the porch‚ facing each other‚ each leaning against a supporting post. ?What folly! to bathe at such an hour in such heat!? exclaimed Mr. Pontellier. He himself had taken a plunge at daylight. That was why the morning seemed long to him. ?You are burnt beyond recognition‚? he added‚ looking at his wife as one looks at a valuable piece of personal property which has suffered some damage. She held up her hands‚ strong‚ shapely hands‚ and surveyed them critically‚ drawing up her fawn sleeves above the wrists. Looking at them reminded her of her rings‚ which she had given to her husband before leaving for the beach. She silently reached out to him‚ and he‚ understanding‚ took the rings from his vest pocket and dropped them into her open palm. She slipped them upon her fingers; then clasping her knees‚ she looked across at Robert and began to laugh. The rings sparkled upon her fingers. He sent back an answering smile. . . . Mr. Pontellier. . . yawned and . . . [went] over to Klein’s hotel and play a game of billiards. ?Come go along‚ Lebrun‚? he proposed to Robert. But Robert admitted quite frankly that he preferred to stay where he was and talk to Mrs. Pontellier.Because while men were expected to have affairs‚ women were expected to remain chaste‚ thus making scandalous flirtation between married people and unmarried people acceptable within refined Creole culture. Mr. Pontellier thought nothing of Edna and__________ going on excursions together without him."
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14) "Who is the narrator of the psychological masterpiece of fear‚ isolation‚ failure‚ and guilt from which this excerpt is taken?Regarding his procession of memory he felt gleeful and unregretting‚ for in it his public deeds were paraded in great and shining prominence. Those performances which had been witnessed by his fellows marched now in wide purple and gold‚ having various deflections. They went gayly with music. It was pleasure to watch these things. He spent delightful minutes viewing the gilded images of memory. He saw that he was good. He recalled with a thrill of joy the respectful comments of his fellows upon his conduct. Nevertheless‚ the ghost of his flight from the first engagement appeared to him and danced. There were small shoutings in his brain about these matters. For a moment he blushed‚ and the light of his soul flickered with shame. A specter of reproach came to him. There loomed the dogging memory of the tattered soldier?he who‚ gored by bullets and faint of blood‚ had fretted concerning an imagined wound in another; he who had loaned his last of strength and intellect for the tall soldier; he who‚ blind with weariness and pain‚ had been deserted in the field."
15) "Grateful return for happiness conferred is not the method of exchange in a partnership. . . . [A] manufacturer who marries‚ or a doctor‚ or a lawyer‚ does not take a partner in his business‚ when he takes a partner in parenthood‚ unless his wife is also a manufacturer‚ a doctor‚ or a lawyer. In his business‚ she cannot even advise wisely without training and experience. To love her husband‚ the composer‚ does not enable her to compose; and the loss of a man’s wife‚ though it may break his heart‚ does not cripple his business‚ unless his mind is affected by grief. She is in no sense a business partner‚ unless she contributes capital or experience or labor‚ as a man would in like relation. Most men would hesitate very seriously before entering a business partnership with any woman‚ wife or not.If the wife is not‚ then‚ truly a business partner‚ in what way does she earn from her husband the food‚ clothing‚ and shelter she receives at his hands? By house service‚ it will be instantly replied. This is the general misty idea upon the subject‚?that women earn all they get‚ and more‚ by house service. . . .To take this ground and hold it honestly‚ wives‚ as earners through domestic service‚ are entitled to the wages of cooks‚ housemaids‚ nursemaids‚ seamstresses‚ or housekeepers‚ . . . .But the salient fact in this discussion is that‚ whatever the economic value of the domestic industry of women is‚ they do not get it. The women who do the most work get the least money‚ and the women who have the most money do the least work. Their labor is neither given nor taken as a factor in economic exchange. It is held to be their duty as women to do this work; and their economic status bears no relation to their domestic labors . . . .___________ and Economics (1898)‚ by Charlotte Perkins Gilman‚considered the ?feminist manifesto?‚ identified her views that women’s dependence on men stunts the growth of not only women but also the entire ?species? of humanity. Gilman proposed a society consisting entirely of women and children In Herland (1915)."
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16) "In Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage (1895)‚ The __________ War is the historical context.Regarding his procession of memory he felt gleeful and unregretting‚ for in it his public deeds were paraded in great and shining prominence. Those performances which had been witnessed by his fellows marched now in wide purple and gold‚ having various deflections. They went gayly with music. It was pleasure to watch these things. He spent delightful minutes viewing the gilded images of memory. He saw that he was good. He recalled with a thrill of joy the respectful comments of his fellows upon his conduct.Nevertheless‚ the ghost of his flight from the first engagement appeared to him and danced. There were small shoutings in his brain about these matters. For a moment he blushed‚ and the light of his soul flickered with shame. A specter of reproach came to him. There loomed the dogging memory of the tattered soldier?he who‚ gored by bullets and faint of blood‚ had fretted concerning an imagined wound in another; he who had loaned his last of strength and intellect for the tall soldier; he who‚ blind with weariness and pain‚ had been deserted in the field."
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17) "?Yes‚ come any time you want to‚? said my host‚ ??t ain’t so pleasant as when poor dear was here. Oh‚ I did n’t want to lose her an’ she did n’t want to go‚ but it had to be. Such things ain’t for us to say; there’s no yes an’ no to it.?? . . . Poor dear‚ she always thought a sight o’ Almiry. . . .?We laughed together like the best of friends‚ and I spoke again about the fishing grounds‚ and confessed that I had no fancy for a southerly breeze and a ground swell.?Nor me neither‚? said the old fisherman. ?Nobody likes ?em‚ say what they may. Poor dear was disobliged by the mere sight of a bo’t. Almiry ?s got the best o’ mothers‚ I expect you know; Mis’ Blackett out to Green Island; and we was always plannin’ to go out when summer come; but there‚ I could n’t pick no day’s weather that seemed to suit her just right. . . . she was so pleasant we could n’t have no fret nor trouble. ?T was never ?you dear an’ you darlin’ ?afore folks‚ an’ ?you divil’ behind the door!?As I looked back from the lower end of the field I saw him still standing‚ a lonely figure in the doorway. ?Poor dear‚? I repeated to myself half aloud; ?I wonder where she is and what she knows of the little world she left. I wonder what she has been doing these eight years!? During the course of her stay/summer visit to Dunnet Landing‚ Maine‚ the inhabitants of the coastal town share vignettes of their lives. This is narrated by a lone unnamed writer‚ a young woman. In this excerpt‚ Elijah Tilley‚ an old seaman‚ reminisces about his deceased wife‚ Sarah. ?Almiry? is Mrs. Almira Todd‚ the local herbalist and the narrator’s hostess. This excerpt is taken from what book?"
18) "What was the famous pseudonym of the author of this excerpt‚ Samuel Langhorne Clemens?Well‚ I catched my breath and most fainted. Shut up on a wreck with such a gang as that! But it warn’t no time to be sentimentering. . . . No sign of a boat. Jim said he didn’t believe he could go any further?so scared he hadn’t hardly any strength left‚ he said. But I said‚ come on‚ if we get left on this wreck we are in a fix‚ sure. So on we prowled again. We struck for the stern of the Texas‚ and found it‚ and then scrabbled along forwards on the skylight‚ hanging on from shutter to shutter‚ for the edge of the skylight was in the water. When we got pretty close to the cross-hall door there was the skiff‚ sure enough! I could just barely see her. I felt ever so thankful. In another second I would a been aboard of her‚ but just then the door opened. One of the men stuck his head out only about a couple of foot from me‚ and I thought I was gone . . . .Then Jim manned the oars‚ and we took out after our raft. Now was the first time that I begun to worry about the men?I reckon I hadn’t had time to before. I begun to think how dreadful it was‚ even for murderers‚ to be in such a fix. I says to myself‚ there ain’t no telling but I might come to be a murderer myself yet‚ and then how would I like it?"
19) "This excerpt is from ________book by Jack London.Buck did not read the newspapers‚ or he would have known that trouble was brewing‚ not alone for himself‚ but for every tide-water dog‚ strong of muscle and with warm‚ long hair‚ from Puget Sound to San Diego. Because men‚ groping in the Arctic darkness‚ had found a yellow metal‚ and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the find‚ thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted dogs‚ and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs‚ with strong muscles by which to toil‚ and furry coats to protect them from the frost."
20) ""I should like very much to know your name‚" said Winterbourne."Her name is Daisy Miller!" cried the child. "But that isn’t her real name; that isn’t her name on her cards.""It’s a pity you haven’t got one of my cards!" said Miss Miller."Her real name is Annie P. Miller‚" the boy went on. . . ."My father’s name is Ezra B. Miller‚" he announced. "My father ain’t in Europe; my father’s in a better place than Europe."Winterbourne imagined for a moment that this was the manner in which the child had been taught to intimate that Mr. Miller had been removed to the sphere of celestial reward. But Randolph immediately added‚ "My father’s in Schenectady. He’s got a big business. My father’s rich‚ you bet!" . . . ."Mother’s going to get a teacher for him as soon as we get to Italy. Can you get good teachers in Italy?""Very good‚ I should think‚" said Winterbourne."Or else she’s going to find some school. He ought to learn some more. He’s only nine. He’s going to college." And in this way Miss Miller continued to converse upon the affairs of her family and upon other topics. She sat there with her extremely pretty hands‚ ornamented with very brilliant rings‚ folded in her lap‚ and with her pretty eyes now resting upon those of Winterbourne‚ now wandering over the garden‚ the people who passed by‚ and the beautiful view. She talked to Winterbourne as if she had known him a long time. He found it very pleasant.His ?international? theme explores the interaction between na?ve Americans and sophisticated Europeans. Unlike Jack London‚ Theodore Dreiser‚ and Frank Norris‚ whose characters were usually lower- or middle-class‚ Henry________ usually created upper-class characters within refined society. "
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21) "What did Booker T. Washington tell students that people would NOT excuse?From the first I have sought to impress the students with the idea that Tuskegee is not my institution‚ or that of the officers‚ but that it is their institution‚ and that they have as much interest in it as any of the trustees or instructors. . . .It was my aim from the first at Tuskegee to not only have the buildings erected by the students themselves‚ but to have them make their own furniture as far as was possible. I now marvel at the patience of the students while sleeping upon the floor while waiting for some kind of a bedstead to be constructed . . . .. . . . Over and over again the students were reminded . . . that people would excuse us for our poverty‚ for our lack of comforts and conveniences‚ but that they would not excuse us for dirt.Another thing that has been insisted upon at the school is the use of the tooth-brush. . . . three girls who had recently arrived at the school . . . replied‚ pointing to a brush: ?Yes‚ sir. That is our brush. We bought it together‚ yesterday.? It did not take them long to learn a different lesson. . . . Absolute cleanliness of the body has been insisted upon from the first. The students have been taught to bathe as regularly as to take their meals. . . . For a long time one of the most difficult tasks was to teach the students that all the buttons were to be kept on their clothes‚ and that there must be no torn places or grease-spots."
22) "I have called my tiny community a world‚ and so its isolation made it; and yet there was among us but a half-awakened common consciousness‚ sprung from common joy and grief‚ at burial‚ birth‚ or wedding; from a common hardship in poverty‚ poor land‚ and low wages; and‚ above all‚ from the sight of the Veil that hung between us and Opportunity. All this caused us to think some thoughts to-gether; but these‚ when ripe for speech‚ were spoken in various languages. Those whose eyes twenty-five and more years before had seen ?the glory of the coming of the Lord‚? saw in every present hindrance or help a dark fatalism bound to bring all things right in His own good time. The mass of those to whom slavery was a dim recollection of childhood found the world a puzzling thing: it asked little of them‚ and they answered with little‚ and yet it ridiculed their offering. Such a paradox they could not understand‚ and therefore sank into listless indifference‚ or shiftlessness‚ or reckless bravado.Because of __________ ‚ DuBois’ ?tiny community? was isolated."
23) "?I don’t care to say it to his face‚?I don’t like the principle‚?but since you ask me about it‚ I’d just as lief say that I’ve never had any young man take hold here equal to your son. I don’t know as you care.??You make me very happy‚? said Bromfield Corey. ?Very happy indeed. I’ve always had the idea that there was something in my son‚ if he could only find the way to work it out. And he seems to have gone into your business for the love of it.??He went to work in the right way‚ sir! He told me about it. He looked into it. And that paint is a thing that will bear looking into.??Oh yes. You might think he had invented it‚ if you heard him celebrating it.??Is that so?? demanded Lapham‚ pleased through and through. ?Well‚ there ain’t any other way. You’ve got to believe in a thing before you can put any heart in it. Why‚ I had a partner in this thing once‚ along back just after the war‚ and he used to be always wanting to tinker with something else. ?Why‚’ says I‚ ?you’ve got the best thing in God’s universe now. Why ain’t you satisfied?’ I had to get rid of him at last. . . . No‚ sir‚ you’ve got to believe in a thing. And I believe in your son. And I don’t mind telling you that‚ so far as he’s gone‚ he’s a success.?Other characters in this story are Silas’ wife‚ Persis‚ and his younger daughter‚ Irene. In this novel by William Dean Howells The self-made businessman ___________ ultimately encounters misfortune in business but escapes with improved moral character. His daughter‚ Penelope‚ marries the higher-class Tom Corey. "
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24) "From the first I have sought to impress the students with the idea that Tuskegee is not my institution‚ or that of the officers‚ but that it is their institution‚ and that they have as much interest in it as any of the trustees or instructors. . . .It was my aim from the first at Tuskegee to not only have the buildings erected by the students themselves‚ but to have them make their own furniture as far as was possible. I now marvel at the patience of the students while sleeping upon the floor while waiting for some kind of a bedstead to be constructed . . . .. . . . Over and over again the students were reminded . . . that people would excuse us for our poverty‚ for our lack of comforts and conveniences‚ but that they would not excuse us for dirt.Another thing that has been insisted upon at the school is the use of the tooth-brush. . . . three girls who had recently arrived at the school .. . replied‚ pointing to a brush: ?Yes‚ sir. That is our brush. We bought it together‚ yesterday.? It did not take them long to learn a different lesson. . . . Absolute cleanliness of the body has been insisted upon from the first. The students have been taught to bathe as regularly as to take their meals. . . . For a long time one of the most difficult tasks was to teach the students that all the buttons were to be kept on their clothes‚ and that there must be no torn places or grease-spots.By educating them and by training them in__________ skills‚ Booker T. Washington sought to equip African-Americans for non-violent integration into white society."
25) "Who is the displaced dentist in this story? But McTeague never became a drunkard in the generally received sense of the term. He did not drink to excess more than two or three times in a month‚ and never upon any occasion did he become maudlin or staggering. Perhaps his nerves were naturally too dull to admit of any excitation; perhaps he did not really care for the whiskey‚ and only drank because Heise and the other men at Frenna’s did. Trina could often reproach him with drinking too much; she never could say that he was drunk. The alcohol had its effect for all that. It roused the man‚ or rather the brute in the man‚ and now not only roused it‚ but goaded it to evil. McTeague’s nature changed. It was not only the alcohol‚ it was idleness and a general throwing off of the good influence his wife had had over him in the days of their prosperity. McTeague disliked Trina. She was a perpetual irritation to him. She annoyed him because she was so small‚ so prettily made‚ so invariably correct and precise. Her avarice incessantly harassed him. Her industry was a constant reproach to him. She seemed to flaunt her work defiantly in his face. It was the red flag in the eyes of the bull."
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