CLEP Modernism Period (1910-1945) Literary Interpretation Part 2  Practice Test >> Exam 1

Question 1 of 30
Date: 18/01/2019 22:58:42
Time Remaining :
1) " F. Scott Fitzgerald reflects American society during the 1920s‚ illustrating the disintegration of the American Dream‚ showing that wealth and class do not ultimately satisfy human longing.In The Great _____________(1925).He hadn’t once ceased looking at Daisy‚ and I think he revalued everything in his house according to the measure of response it drew from her well-loved eyes. Sometimes‚ too‚ he stared around at his possessions in a dazed way‚ as though in her actual and astounding presence none of it was any longer real. Once he nearly toppled down a flight of stairs. . . .?It’s the funniest thing‚ old sport‚? he said hilariously. ?I can’t?When I try to??He had passed visibly through two states and was entering upon a third. After his embarrassment and his unreasoning joy he was consumed with wonder at her presence. He had been full of the idea so long‚ dreamed it right through to the end‚ waited with his teeth set‚ so to speak‚ at an inconceivable pitch of intensity. Now‚ in the reaction‚ he was running down like an overwound clock. . . .He took out a pile of shirts and began throwing them‚ one by one‚ before us‚ shirts of sheer linen and thick silk and fine flannel‚ which lost their folds as they fell and covered the table in many-colored disarray. While we admired he brought more and the soft rich heap mounted higher . . . . Suddenly‚ with a strained sound‚ Daisy bent her head into the shirts and began to cry stormily.?They’re such beautiful shirts‚? she sobbed‚ her voice muffled in the thick folds. ?It makes me sad because I’ve never seen such?such beautiful shirts before.?[two chapters later]. . .?She’s got an indiscreet voice‚? I remarked. ?It’s full of?? I hesitated.?Her voice is full of money‚? he [Gatsby] said suddenly. That was it. I’d never understood before. It was full of money?that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it‚ the jingle of it‚ the cymbals’ song of it. . . . high in a white palace the king’s daughter‚ the golden girl. . . ."
Ans:
2) "In ?The __________of Ice Cream? (1923)‚ death triumphs over physical satisfaction in Wallace Stevens’ poem.Call the roller of big cigars‚The muscular one‚ and bid him whip In kitchen cups concupiscent curds.Let the wenches dawdle in such dress As they are used to wear‚ and let the boys 5 Bring flowers in last month’s newspapers.Let be be finale of seem.The only emperor is the emperor of ice-cream.Take from the dresser of deal‚Lacking the three glass knobs‚ that sheet 10 On which she embroidered fantails once And spread it so as to cover her face.If her horny feet protrude‚ they come To show how cold she is‚ and dumb.Let the lamp affix its beam. 15 The only emperor is the emperor of ice-cream."
Ans:
3) " This short story contains which characters? (Check all that apply.)The old man watched for him to come again but neither shark showed. Then he saw one on the surface swimming in circles. He did not see the fin of the other. I could not expect to kill them‚ he thought. I could have in my time. But I have hurt them both badly and neither one can feel very good. If I could have used a bat with two hands I could have killed the first one surely. Even now‚ he thought. He did not want to look at the fish. He knew that half of him had been destroyed. The sun had gone down while he had been in the fight with the sharks. "It will be dark soon‚" he said. "Then I should see the glow of Havana. If I am too far to the eastward I will see the lights of one of the new beaches." I cannot be too far out now‚ he thought. I hope no one has been too worried. There is only the boy to worry‚ of course. But I am sure he would have confidence. Many of the older fishermen will worry. Many others too‚ he thought. I live in a good town. He could not talk to the fish anymore because the fish had been ruined too badly. . . . I have all those prayers I promised if I caught the fish he thought. But I am too tired to say them now."
4) " This excerpt identifies__________ __________ ’s frustration at her/his inability to alter her/his circumstances.With the sudden perception of the point to which his madness had carried him‚ the madness fell and he saw his life before him as it was. He was a poor man‚ the husband of a sickly woman‚ whom his desertion would leave alone and destitute; and even if he had had the heart to desert her he could have done so only by deceiving two kindly people who had pitied him.He turned and walked slowly back to the farm."
Ans:
5) ". . . it was found that the State would have to have much more money. Its quota of troops would have to be equipped and paid. There were measures of defense to be taken‚ the treasury to be replenished. A call for a loan of twenty-three million dollars was finally authorized by the legislature and issued. There was great talk in the street as to who was to handle it?Drexel & Co. and Jay Cooke & Co.‚ of course.Cowperwood pondered over this. If he could handle a fraction of this great loan now?he could not possibly handle the whole of it‚ for he had not the necessary connections?he could add considerably to his reputation as a broker while making a tidy sum. How much could he handle? That was the question. Who would take portions of it? His father’s bank? Probably. Waterman & Co.? A little. Judge Kitchen? A small fraction. The Mills-David Company? Yes. He thought of different individuals and concerns who‚ for one reason and another?personal friendship‚ good-nature‚ gratitude for past favors‚ and so on?would take a percentage of the seven-percent bonds through him. He totaled up his possibilities‚ and discovered that in all likelihood‚ with a little preliminary missionary work‚ he could dispose of one million dollars if personal influence‚ through local political figures‚ could bring this much of the loan his way.Journalists were referred to as______________ who exposed corruption ."
Ans:
6) "Search for the Holy ‚ a quest for ______‚ is an illusion within this poem.April is the cruellest month‚ breeding Lilacs out of the dead land‚ mixing Memory and desire‚ stirring Dull roots with spring rain.Winter kept us warm‚ covering 5 Earth in forgetful snow‚ feeding A little life with dried tubers.Summer surprised us‚ coming over the Starnbergersee With a shower of rain; we stopped in the colonnade‚And went on in sunlight‚ into the Hofgarten‚ 10And drank coffee‚ and talked for an hour.Bin gar keine Russin‚ stamm’ aus Litauen‚ echt deutsch.And when we were children‚ staying at the archduke’s‚My cousin’s‚ he took me out on a sled‚And I was frightened. He said‚ Marie‚ 15 Marie‚ hold on tight. And down we went.In the mountains‚ there you feel free.I read‚ much of the night‚ and go south in the winter."
7) "Name the author of this poem?I‚ too‚ sing America.I am the darker brother.They send me to eat in the kitchen When company comes‚But I laugh‚ 5And eat well‚And grow strong.Tomorrow‚I’ll be at the table When company comes. 10 Nobody’ll dare Say to me‚ "Eat in the kitchen‚"Then.Besides‚ 15They’ll see how beautiful I am And be ashamed?I‚ too‚ am America."
8) ""Ever’body in?" Pa asked."All but Connie an’ Rosasharn. They went off to sleep in the open. Says it’s too warm in under cover."Pa observed querulously‚ "That Rosasharn is gettin’ awful scary an’ nimsy-mimsy.""It’s her first‚" said Ma. "Her an’ Connie sets a lot a store by it. You done the same thing.""We’ll go now‚" Tom said. "Pull off the road a little piece ahead. Watch out for us ef we don’t see you. Be off right-han’ side.""Al’sstayin’P""Yeah. Leave Uncle John come with us. ’Night‚ Ma."Biblical allusions‚ such as the Israelites wandering in the wilderness looking for the Promised Land and the Joads wandering through the West looking for jobs is Symbolised in this novel including the _____________family as representative of humanity."
Ans:
9) "During what time period‚ did John Steinbeck’s novel‚ Grapes of Wrath (1939)‚ and the migration of the Okies was set?Ever’body in?" Pa asked."All but Connie an’ Rosasharn. They went off to sleep in the open. Says it’s too warm in under cover."Pa observed querulously‚ "That Rosasharn is gettin’ awful scary an’ nimsy-mimsy.""It’s her first‚" said Ma. "Her an’ Connie sets a lot a store by it. You done the same thing.""We’ll go now‚" Tom said. "Pull off the road a little piece ahead. Watch out for us ef we don’t see you. Be off right-han’ side.""Al’sstayin’P""Yeah. Leave Uncle John come with us. ’Night‚ Ma.""
10) "This poem is ?anyone lived in a pretty ______town? (1940)‚ by e.e. cummings.anyone lived in a pretty how town (with up so floating many bells down)spring summer autumn winter he sang his didn’t he danced his did Women and men (both little and small)5 cared for anyone not at all they sowed their isn’t they reaped their same sun moon stars rain children guessed (but only a few and down they forgot as up they grew 10 autumn winter spring summer)that noone loved him more by more when by now and tree by leaf she laughed his joy she cried his grief bird by snow and stir by still 15 anyone’s any was all to her someones married their everyones laughed their cryings and did their dance (sleep wake hope and then) they said their nevers they slept their dream 20 stars rain sun moon(and only the snow can begin to explain how children are apt to forget to remember with up so floating many bells down) one day anyone died i guess 25 (and noone stooped to kiss his face) busy folk buried them side by side little by little and was by was all by all and deep by deep and more by more they dream their sleep30 noone and anyone earth by april wish by spirit and if by yes.Women and men (both dong and ding) summer autumn winter spring reaped their sowing and went their came 35 sun moon stars rain"
Ans:
11) "?ntonia had always been one to leave images in the mind that did not fade?that grew stronger with time. In my memory there was a succession of such pictures‚ fixed there like the old woodcuts of one’s first primer: ?ntonia kicking her bare legs against the sides of my pony when we came home in triumph with our snake; ?ntonia in her black shawl and fur cap‚ as she stood by her father’s grave in the snowstorm; ?ntonia coming in with her work-team along the evening sky-line. She lent herself to immemorial human attitudes which we recognize by instinct as universal and true. I had not been mistaken. She was a battered woman now‚ not a lovely girl; but she still had that something which fires the imagination‚ could still stop one’s breath for a moment by a look or gesture that somehow revealed the meaning in common things. She had only to stand in the orchard‚ to put her hand on a little crab tree and look up at the apples‚ to make you feel the goodness of planting and tending and harvesting at last. All the strong things of her heart came out in her body‚ that had been so tireless in serving generous emotions. It was no wonder that her sons stood tall and straight. She was a rich mine of life‚ like the founders of early races.What is the tone of this passage?"
12) "From which languages did Ezra Pound used words and phrases in his Cantos? (Click all that apply.)Sound slender‚ quasi tinnula‚Ligur’ aoide: Si no’us vei‚ Domna don plus mi cal‚Negus vezer mon bel pensar no val.?Between the two almond trees flowering‚The veil held close to his side; 5And another: s’adora?.?Possum ego naturae non meminisse tuae!?Qui son Properzio ed Ovidio.The boughs are not more fresh where the almond shoots 10 take their March green.And that year I went up to Freiburg‚ And Rennert had said: Nobody‚ no‚ nobody Knows anything about Proven?al‚ or if there is anybody‚ It’s old L?vy.? 15 And so I went up to Freiburg‚ And the vacation was just beginning‚ The students getting off for the summer‚ Freiburg im Breisgau‚ And everything clean‚ seeming clean‚ after Italy. 20 And I went to old L?vy‚ and it was by then 6:30 in the evening‚ and he trailed half way across Freiburg before dinner‚ to see the two ships of copy‚Arnaut’s‚ settant’uno R. superiore (Ambrosiana)Not that I could sing him the music.25 And he said: Now is there anything I can tell you??And I said: I dunno‚ sir‚ or ?Yes‚ Doctor‚ what do they mean by noigandres??And he said: Noigandres! NOIgandres!"
13) "From which book does this excerpt belong to? With the sudden perception of the point to which his madness had carried him‚ the madness fell and he saw his life before him as it was. He was a poor man‚ the husband of a sickly woman‚ whom his desertion would leave alone and destitute; and even if he had had the heart to desert her he could have done so only by deceiving two kindly people who had pitied him.He turned and walked slowly back to the farm."
14) "Who are the characters in the novel from which the passage below is excerpted? (Click all that apply.)He had met Tanis’s friends; he had‚ with the ardent haste of the Midnight People‚ who drink and dance and rattle and are ever afraid to be silent‚ been adopted as a member of her group‚ which they called ?The Bunch.? He first met them after a day when he had worked particularly hard and when he hoped to be quiet with Tanis and slowly sip her admiration. . . . . As Tanis opened the door he saw fantastic figures dancing in a haze of cigarette smoke. The tables and chairs were against the wall. . . . As he danced he surveyed the rest of the Bunch: . . . . Miss Sonntag greeted him with an astringent ?How d’you do‚ Mr. Babbitt. Tanis tells me you’re a very prominent man‚ and I’m honored by being allowed to drive with you. Of course I’m not accustomed to associating with society people like you‚ so I don’t know how to act in such exalted circles!? Thus Miss Sonntag talked all the way down to Healey Hanson’s. To her jibes he wanted to reply ?Oh‚ go to the devil!? but he never quite nerved himself to that reasonable comment. He was resenting the existence of the whole Bunch. He had heard Tanis speak of ?darling Carrie? and ?Min Sonntag?she’s so clever?you’ll adore her‚? but they had never been real to him. He had pictured Tanis as living in a rose-tinted vacuum‚ waiting for him‚ free of all the complications of a Floral Heights."
15) "Motto for his poetry was ?no ideas but in ?________________! by The Imagist William Carlos Williams’.Paterson lies in the valley under the Passaic Fallsits spent waters forming the outline of his back. He lies on his right side‚ head near the thunder of the waters filling his dreams! Eternally asleep‚his dreams walk about the city where he persists5 incognito. Butterflies settle on his stone ear.Immortal he neither moves nor rouses and is seldom seen‚ though he breathes and the subtleties of his machinations drawing their substance from the noise of the pouring river animate a thousand automations. Who because they 10 neither know their sources nor the sills of their disappointments walk outside their bodies aimlessly for the most part‚locked and forgot in their desires-unroused.?Say it‚ no ideas but in things? 15 nothing but the blank faces of the houses and cylindrical trees bent‚ forked by preconception and accident?split‚ furrowed‚ creased‚ mottled‚ stained?secret?into the body of the light!20 From above‚ higher than the spires‚ higher even than the office towers‚ from oozy fields abandoned to gray beds of dead grass‚black sumac‚ withered weed-stalks‚mud and thickets cluttered with dead leaves- 25 the river comes pouring in above the city and crashes from the edge of the gorge in a recoil of spray and rainbow mists-(What common language to unravel?. . .combed into straight lines30 from that rafter of a rock’slip.)"
Ans:
16) "Who is the author of the book from which this passage is taken?With the sudden perception of the point to which his madness had carried him‚ the madness fell and he saw his life before him as it was. He was a poor man‚ the husband of a sickly woman‚ whom his desertion would leave alone and destitute; and even if he had had the heart to desert her he could have done so only by deceiving two kindly people who had pitied him.He turned and walked slowly back to the farm."
17) "After the Civil War and Reconstruction‚ chronicles the decline of the ________family‚ This story set in Yoknapatawpha County‚ Mississippi.We were playing in the branch and Caddy squatted down and got her dress wet and Versh said‚"Your mommer going to whip you for getting your dress wet." . . ."It’s not wet." Caddy said. She stood up in the water and looked at her dress. "I’ll take it off." she said. "Then it’ll dry." . . ."You just take your dress off." Quentin said. Caddy took her dress off and threw it on the bank. Then she didn’t have on anything but her bodice and drawers‚ and Quentin slapped her and she slipped and fell down in the water. When she got up she began to splash water on Quentin‚ and Quentin splashed water on Caddy. Some of it splashed on Versh and me and Versh picked me up and put me on the bank. He said he was going to tell on Caddy and Quentin‚ and then Quentin and Caddy began to splash water at Versh. He got behind a bush."I’m going to tell mammy on you all." Versh said. . . ."Now I guess you’re satisfied." Quentin said. "We’ll both get whipped now.""I dont care." Caddy said. "I’ll run away."I began to cry.Caddy turned around and said "Hush" So I hushed. Then they played in the branch. . . . and I started to cry and she came and squatted in the water."Hush now." she said. "I’m not going to run away." So I hushed. Caddy smelled like trees in the rain."
Ans:
18) "Miniver Cheevy‚ child of scorn‚Grew lean while he assailed the seasons He wept that he was ever born‚And he had reasons.Miniver loved the days of old 5 When swords were bright and steeds were prancing;The vision of a warrior bold Would send him dancing.Miniver sighed for what was not‚And dreamed‚ and rested from his labors; 10 He dreamed of Thebes and Camelot‚And Priam’s neighbors.Miniver mourned the ripe renown That made so many a name so fragrant;He mourned Romance‚ now on the town‚ 15 And Art‚ a vagrant.Miniver loved the Medici‚Albeit he had never seen one;He would have sinned incessantly Could he have been one.20 Miniver cursed the commonplace And eyed a khaki suit with loathing:He missed the medieval grace Of iron clothing.Miniver scorned the gold he sought‚ 25 But sore annoyed was he without it;Miniver thought‚ and thought‚ and thought‚ And thought about it.Miniver Cheevy‚ born too late‚Scratched his head and kept on thinking; 30 Miniver coughed‚ and called it fate‚And kept on drinking.In line 3‚ why did Miniver Cheevy weep ?"
19) "Title of the poem is __________‚ from which this selection is excerpted?April is the cruellest month‚ breeding Lilacs out of the dead land‚ mixing Memory and desire‚ stirring Dull roots with spring rain.Winter kept us warm‚ covering 5 Earth in forgetful snow‚ feeding A little life with dried tubers.Summer surprised us‚ coming over the Starnbergersee With a shower of rain; we stopped in the colonnade‚And went on in sunlight‚ into the Hofgarten‚ 10 And drank coffee‚ and talked for an hour.Bin gar keine Russin‚ stamm’ aus Litauen‚ echt deutsch.And when we were children‚ staying at the archduke’s‚My cousin’s‚ he took me out on a sled‚And I was frightened. He said‚ Marie‚ 15 Marie‚ hold on tight. And down we went.In the mountains‚ there you feel free.I read‚ much of the night‚ and go south in the winter."
20) "His claim to American rights and privileges is identified by this speaker‚ by reminding that he is a ________________.I‚ too‚ sing America.I am the darker brother.They send me to eat in the kitchen When company comes‚But I laugh‚ 5 And eat well‚And grow strong.Tomorrow‚I’ll be at the table When company comes. 10 Nobody’ll dare Say to me‚"Eat in the kitchen‚"Then.Besides‚ 15 They’ll see how beautiful I am And be ashamed?I‚ too‚ am America."
Ans:
21) "In this section of The Sound and the Fury (1929)‚ by William Faulkner _______________ is narrated.We were playing in the branch and Caddy squatted down and got her dress wet and Versh said‚"Your mommer going to whip you for getting your dress wet." . . ."It’s not wet." Caddy said. She stood up in the water and looked at her dress. "I’ll take it off." she said. "Then it’ll dry." . . ."You just take your dress off." Quentin said. Caddy took her dress off and threw it on the bank. Then she didn’t have on anything but her bodice and drawers‚ and Quentin slapped her and she slipped and fell down in the water. When she got up she began to splash water on Quentin‚ and Quentin splashed water on Caddy. Some of it splashed on Versh and me and Versh picked me up and put me on the bank. He said he was going to tell on Caddy and Quentin‚ and then Quentin and Caddy began to splash water at Versh. He got behind a bush."I’m going to tell mammy on you all." Versh said. . . ."Now I guess you’re satisfied." Quentin said. "We’ll both get whipped now.""I dont care." Caddy said. "I’ll run away."I began to cry.Caddy turned around and said "Hush" So I hushed. Then they played in the branch. . . . and I started to cry and she came and squatted in the water."Hush now." she said. "I’m not going to run away." So I hushed. Caddy smelled like trees in the rain."
Ans:
22) "In line 12‚ Where did the speaker go ?Sound slender‚ quasi tinnula‚Ligur’ aoide: Si no’us vei‚ Domna don plus mi cal‚Negus vezer mon bel pensar no val.?Between the two almond trees flowering‚The veil held close to his side;5 And another: s’adora?.?Possum ego naturae non meminisse tuae!?Qui son Properzio ed Ovidio.The boughs are not more fresh where the almond shoots 10 take their March green.And that year I went up to Freiburg‚And Rennert had said: Nobody‚ no‚ nobody Knows anything about Proven?al‚ or if there is anybody‚It’s old L?vy.? 15 And so I went up to Freiburg‚And the vacation was just beginning‚The students getting off for the summer‚Freiburg im Breisgau‚And everything clean‚ seeming clean‚ after Italy. 20 And I went to old L?vy‚ and it was by then 6:30 in the evening‚ and he trailed half way across Freiburg before dinner‚ to see the two ships of copy‚Arnaut’s‚ settant’uno R. superiore (Ambrosiana)Not that I could sing him the music.25 And he said: Now is there anything I can tell you??And I said: I dunno‚ sir‚ or ?Yes‚ Doctor‚ what do they mean by noigandres?? And he said: Noigandres! NOIgandres!"
23) "Native Son (1940)‚ a book by Richard Wright. What are the sections of this book? (Click all that apply.)He wanted to move from the bed‚ but was afraid he would stumble over something and Mrs. Dalton would hear him‚ would know that someone besides Mary was in the room. Frenzy dominated him. He held his hand over her mouth and his head was cocked at an angle that enabled him to see Mary and Mrs. Dalton by merely shifting his eyes. Mary mumbled and tried to rise again. Frantically‚ he caught a corner of the pillow and brought it to her lips. He had to stop her from mumbling‚ or he would be caught. Mrs. Dalton was moving slowly toward him and he grew tight and full‚ as though about to explode. Mary’s fingernails tore at his hands and he caught the pillow and covered her entire face with it‚ firmly. . . . he pushed downward upon the pillow with all of his weight‚ determined that she must not move or make any sound that would betray him."
24) "In which verse is this poem written?Hog Butcher for the World‚Tool Maker‚ Stacker of Wheat‚Player with Railroads and the Nation’s Freight Handler;Stormy‚ husky‚ brawling‚City of the Big Shoulders: 5They tell me you are wicked and I believe them‚ for I have seen your painted women under the gas lamps luring the farm boys.And they tell me you are crooked and I answer: Yes‚ it is true I have seen the gunman kill and go free to 10 kill again. And they tell me you are brutal and my reply is: On the faces of women and children I have seen the marks of wanton hunger.And having answered so I turn once more to those who15 sneer at this my city‚ and I give them back the sneer and say to them:Come and show me another city with lifted head singing so proud to be alive and coarse and strong and cunning.Flinging magnetic curses amid the toil of piling job on 20 job‚ here is a tall bold slugger set vivid against the little soft cities;Fierce as a dog with tongue lapping for action‚ cunning as a savage pitted against the wilderness‚ Bareheaded‚ 25 Shoveling‚ Wrecking‚Planning‚Building‚ breaking‚ rebuilding‚Under the smoke‚ dust all over his mouth‚ laughing with 30 white teeth‚Under the terrible burden of destiny laughing as a youngman laughs‚Laughing even as an ignorant fighter laughs who has never lost a battle‚ 35 Bragging and laughing that under his wrist is the pulse.and under his ribs the heart of the people‚Laughing!Laughing the stormy‚ husky‚ brawling laughter of Youth‚ half-naked‚ sweating‚ proud to be Hog 40 Butcher‚ Tool Maker‚ Stacker of Wheat‚ Player withRailroads and Freight Handler to the Nation."

All form fields are required.

Name :

Email :