Georgia Climate and Weather

Georgia Climate and Weather

Climate of Georgia

The weather of Georgia is distinctive of a moist subtropical weather with most part of the state having gentle wintry weather and hot and arid summers. The Atlantic Ocean on the east coast of Georgia and the hilly nation in the north influences a big deal to the state's climate. In addition, the Chattahoochee River splits Georgia into two different climatic sections with hilly districts to the northwest being more chilled than the rest parts of Georgia, and the standard temperature for that district in January and July is 39 °F (4 °C) and 78 °F (26 °C) respectively. Wintry weather in Georgia is marked by placid temperatures and modest snowfall in the region of the state, with more chill, more snow and more ice, mostly in the regions of northern and central Georgia. A lot of summer days in Georgia are famous for the exceeding temperature of about 90 °F (32 °C). The state faces an extensive rainfall. Hurricanes and tropical typhoons are frequent.

Georgia Temperature

The most parts of Georgia are mainly subjected to a moist subtropical weather marked by, to some extent, sporadic glacial winds in the wintry weather. Hot, arid and moist summers are distinctive, apart from the hills and mountains. The level to which the climate of a certain part of Georgia is subtropical is mainly based not just on the geographical position, but also on how near it is to the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico and on the height above sea level. This is particularly factual in the rocky regions in the northern division of the province, which are more far from ocean waters and can be up to the height of 4,500 feet (1,400 m) or more above sea level. The regions close to the Florida/Georgia boundaries, stretching from the total Georgia shoreline west to the Florida, witnesses the extreme subtropical climate, alike to that of Florida: hot, dry, moist summers with common noon thunderstorms and gentle and to some extent more dry winters.

Despite being marked by modest climate contrasted with a lot of other states, Georgia has irregular intense climates. The maximum temperature ever in documentation is 112 °F (44 °C), whilst the lowest is −17 °F (−27.2 °C).

Georgia Average Temparature

City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Athens 51/11
33/1
56/13
35/2
65/18
42/6
73/23
49/9
80/27
58/14
87/31
65/18
90/32
69/21
88/31
68/20
82/28
63/17
73/23
51/11
63/17
42/6
54/12
35/2
Atlanta 52/11
34/1
57/14
36/2
65/18
44/7
73/23
50/10
80/27
60/16
87/30
67/19
90/32
71/22
89/31
70/21
84/28
64/18
75/23
53/12
64/17
44/7
56/13
36/2
Augusta 56/13
33/1
61/16
36/4
69/21
42/6
77/25
48/9
84/29
57/14
90/32
65/18
92/33
70/21
90/32
68/20
85/29
62/17
76/24
50/10
68/20
41/5
59/15
35/2
Columbus 57/14
37/3
62/17
39/4
69/21
46/8
76/24
52/11
83/28
61/16
90/32
69/21
92/33
72/22
91/32
72/22
86/30
66/19
77/25
54/12
68/20
46/8
59/15
39/4
Macon 57/14
34/1
61/16
37/3
68/20
44/7
76/24
50/10
83/28
59/15
90/32
67/19
92/33
70/21
91/32
70/21
85/29
64/18
77/25
51/11
68/20
42/6
59/15
36/2
Savannah 60/16
38/3
64/18
41/5
71/22
48/9
78/26
53/12
84/29
61/16
90/32
68/20
92/33
72/22
90/32
71/22
86/30
67/19
78/26
56/13
70/21
47/8
63/17
40/4

Georgia Rainfall

The whole state, together with the north Georgia hills, gets reasonable to intense rainfall, which ranges between 45 inches (1,100 mm) in central parts of Georgia to around 75 inches (1,900 mm) in the northeast regions of the state. Georgia has had severe floods during the earlier periods, particularly in 2007. Tropical Storm Alberto in July 1994 ringed the central parts of Georgia, resulting to 24 hour precipitation of greater than 20 inches (510 mm) in the central regions of the state. Snowfall happens mostly during winters, which is more in regularity and average snowfall per year happens in the north of Georgia.

Winter in Georgia

Southern and south east regions of Georgia witnesses snow less often than the other regions of Georgia. The Georgia Piedmont, at times known as the Blue Ridge region, is to some extent more cool during the winters than the coastal regions. The Southern regions of the Piedmont might get snowfall every year, whereas, regions near the lower hills faces snowfall quite a few times a year. The hills of Georgia have the most cool weather and most recurrent snowstorms in the regions, even though snow is quite less than any other regions of the Appalachian Mountains.

Winter in South Georgia, which is experienced from December to January, is much moderate. Afternoon temperatures varies from roughly 50 °F (10 °C) in the northern most center regions to about 70 °F (21 °C) along the lengths of the shore and in the deep south.

Spring in Georgia

Weather during springtime in North Georgia and the mountains changes from day to day and year to year. Early spring in the North Georgia Mountains can be very chilly during the day; average temperatures are near 62 °F (17 °C). The weather can be highly variable with temperatures ranging between 75 °F (24 °C) and 40 °F (4 °C). The rainiest time of the year is normally April, which can also be a windy month where daytime temperatures can rise to near 75 °F (24 °C) and evening temperatures fall to around 40 °F (4 °C).

Summer in Georgia

Summers are hot, arid and moist with temperatures during the noon that attain, on average, to some what 90 °F (32 °C). During the night temperature decreases to about 68 °F (20 °C) and there is, more often than not, 8 to 10 degree Fahrenheit (or 5 degree Celsius) disparity in temperature between the hilly regions and Atlanta. Though moisture in North Georgia, particularly in the hilly regions can be high, it is not like as it is in South Georgia. Summer showers increases the moisture in the air in the regions by granting 4.5 inches (110 mm) to 5.5 inches (140 mm) of the rainfall throughout the summer season.

Georgia Tornadoes

Georgia is one among the chief states in where tornadoes occur. Southwestern and northern regions of the province have, in the past, witnessed a big number of whirlwinds and tornadoes. The regions most near to Florida boundary report F0 and F1 whirlwinds linked with noon time showers of the summers. On the other hand, tornadoes of F3 strength or bigger in Georgia are unusual, with three of them recorded as a standard every year.