Euro Cup 2016

UEFA Euro 2016 is also known as 2016 UEFA Championship. This tournament will be the 15th European championship for men’s national football teams and which is conducted by UEFA. UEFA Euro 2016 championship is scheduled from 10th June to 10th July in 2016 at France. The UEFA European championship final tournament will be first conducted by 24 teams, which can be extended from the 16 team format of UEFA Euro 1996. In this new format, the winners will contest a group stage including six groups of four teams and after that participated in a knockout stage consisting of three rounds and the finals.

As hosts, France has automatically qualified for the finals, at the same time another 53 national teams will participate in a qualifying competition, which is running from September 2014 to November 2015, to secure the remaining 23 places. After completion of a bidding process on 28 May in 2010, then France was selected as the host. In this they beat Italy and Turkey and the matches will take part in ten stadiums in nine cities:

Bordeaux, Lens, Lille, Lyon, Marseille, Nice, Paris, St-Etienne, Toulouse

The French teams have won title for two times in 1984 and 2000. The winners of this tournament will also eligible to participate in the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup, which is hosted by Russia.

On 23 February 2014, the qualifying draw was conducted at the Palais des Congres Acropolis in Nice and the qualifying matches will start in September 2014. With the increase of 24 teams middle-ranked countries can have a better chance to qualify for the finals as compared to previous match.

A total of 53 teams were divided into eight groups of six teams and 1 group of 5 teams. In this tournament the group winners, runners-up and the best third-placed team will directly qualify to the finals and left off eight third-placed teams will participate in two-legged play-offs to find out the last four qualifiers for the finals.

Host Country: France
Dates: 10 June10 July, 2016
Teams: 24
Venue(s):
10(in 9 host cities)

2016 UEFA Euro Format

UEFA Euro 2016 competition format has changed. Previous 16 teams divided into 4 groups and 2 more groups added, total 24 teams are participating in stage matches. Each team in the group plays a match with their opponents. Winner of the match will gain 3 points and if match draws then each team gains 1 point. Top two leading teams in the each group qualifies for next stage round of 16 which is newly introduced format in UEFA Euro and 4 best teams ranked third place would also qualify for this round.These stage winners forward to quarter finals, then semi finals and finals.

Tie-breaking

In the group stage tie between 2 or more teams then below criteria applied to choose round of 16 qualified

  1. Consider highest points between the teams played matches in tie teams
  2. Consider high goal difference between the teams played matches in tie teams
  3. Consider highest goals scored team between the teams played matches in tie teams
  4. After applying above three points still if there is tie between the teams again above three criteria re-applied exclusively matches between tie teams. Still if there is tie between two teams after re-applying above criteria then below criteria applicable.
  5. Highest goals difference team in all Group stage matches.
  6. Highest goals scored team in all Group stage matches.
  7. Tie exclusively between 2 teams then applying above 6 criteria, if the 2 teams met last round of their group stage match then to determinate the qualify team for next stage chosen by penalty shoot-out
  8. Fair play conduct
    • 1 point for a single yellow card
    • 3 points for a red card as a consequence of two yellow cards
    • 3 points for a direct red card
    • 4 points for a yellow card followed by a direct red card
  9. UEFA national team coefficient ranking system position

Below are the criteria to determinate the 4 teams of third-placed in the Group Stage

  1. Higher number of points obtained
  2. Superior goal difference
  3. Higher number of goals scored
  4. Fair play conduct
  5. UEFA national team coefficient ranking system position

Play-off round 16 Structure

Match 1: Runner-up Group A v Runner-up Group C
Match 2: Winner Group D v 3rd Place Group B/E/F
Match 3: Winner Group B v 3rd Place Group A/C/D
Match 4: Winner Group F v Runner-up Group E
Match 5: Winner Group C v 3rd Place Group A/B/F
Match 6: Winner Group E v Runner-up Group D
Match 7: Winner Group A v 3rd Place Group C/D/E
Match 8: Runner-up Group B v Runner-up Group F

Quarter Finals Structure

Quarter-final 1: Winner Match 1 v Winner Match 2
Quarter-final 2: Winner Match 3 v Winner Match 4
Quarter-final 3: Winner Match 5 v Winner Match 6
Quarter-final 4: Winner Match 7 v Winner Match 8

Semi Finals Structure

Semi-final 1: Winner Quarter-final 1 v Winner Quarter-final 2
Semi-final 2: Winner Quarter-final 3 v Winner Quarter-final 4

Euro Cup 2016 Qualifying Teams

  • Albania
  • Andorra
  • Armenia
  • Austria
  • Azerbaijan
  • Belarus
  • Belgium
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Bulgaria
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • England
  • Estonia
  • Faroe Island
  • Finland
  • Germany
  • Gibraltar
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Kazakhstan
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Macedonia
  • Malta
  • Moldova
  • Montenegro
  • Netherlands
  • Northern Ireland
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Republic of Ireland
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • San Marino
  • Scotland
  • Serbia
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Turkey
  • Ukraine
  • Wales

UEFA European Championship Prize Money

2016 Prize Money

  • Winner: Eur7.5 million 
  • Runner-up: Eur4.5 million
  • Third: Eur1 million
  • Group stage: Eur1 million
  • Draw in the group stages: Eur500,000
  • Quarter-finals: Eur2 million
  • Semi-final: Eur3 million 
  • Qualifing Teams: Eur8 million
  • Total prize money: Eur196 million

Euro Cup 2016 Stadiums

Stade de France

Full name Stade de France
Location ZAC du Cornillon Nord
93216 Saint Denis, France
Coordinates 48°55′28″N 2°21′36″ECoordinates: 48°55′28″N 2°21′36″E
Built 2 May 1995
Opened 28 January 1998
Owner Consortium Stade de France
Operator Consortium Stade de France
Surface Grass
Construction cost €290 million
Architect Michel Macary
Aymeric Zublena
Michel Regembal
Claude Constantini
Capacity 81,338
Executive suites 172
Field dimensions 105 x 70 m
Tenants
France national football team
France national rugby union team
Stade Français (some games)
Racing Métro 92 (some games)

Stade Vélodrome

Full name Stade Vélodrome
Location Marseille, Bouches-du-Rhône,France
Coordinates 43°16′11″N 5°23′45″ECoordinates: 43°16′11″N 5°23′45″E
Built 1937
Opened June 1937
Renovated 1984, 1998, 2014
Owner City of Marseille
Operator AREMA
Surface Grass
Architect Henri Ploquin
Capacity 67,000 (future capacity)
60,031 (pre-renovation capacity)
42,000 (current capacity)
Tenants
Olympique de Marseille
RC Toulon (occasional matches)

Stade des Lumières

Stade des Lumières
(proposed name)
Location Décines
Broke ground 2012
Surface 51 ha
Construction cost 350 to 450 M€
Architect Populous
Capacity 61,556
Tenants
Olympique Lyonnais

Stade Pierre-Mauroy

Location Villeneuve d'Ascq
Coordinates 50.6118833°N 3.13042778°E
Broke ground 2009
Opened 17 August 2012
Owner Eiffage (until 2043)
Operator Eiffage
Surface Grass
Construction cost € 282 million
(Hotel, Restaurant cost € 42 million, Total complex cost € 324 million)
Architect Pierre Ferret
Capacity 50,186
Tenants
Lille OSC (Ligue 1) (2012-)

Parc des Princes

Full name Parc des Princes
Location Paris, France
Coordinates 48°50′29″N 2°15′11″ECoordinates: 48°50′29″N 2°15′11″E
Built 1897
Opened 18 July 1897
Renovated 1932, 1972
Owner City of Paris
Operator SESE
Surface Grass
Construction cost ₣ 90m / € 13m
Architect Roger Taillibert, Siavash Teimouri
Capacity 48,712
Field dimensions 105m x 68m[citation needed]
Tenants
Paris Saint-Germain (1973–present)

New Bordeaux stadium

Full name New Bordeaux stadium (tentative)
Location Bordeaux, France
Broke ground 2013 (planned)
Opened 2015 (planned)
Surface Grass
Construction cost €168 million
Architect Herzog & de Meuron
Capacity 42,566 (UEFA) / 43,000 (Ligue 1)
Tenants
FC Girondins de Bordeaux (Ligue 1) (2015-) and some UEFA Euro 2016 matches

Stade Geoffroy-Guichard

Full name Stade Geoffroy-Guichard
Location Saint-Étienne, Loire, France
Coordinates 45°27′39″N 4°23′25″ECoordinates: 45°27′39″N 4°23′25″E
Built 1930
Opened 13 September 1931
Renovated 1984, 1998
Surface Grass
Capacity 26,747 (temporary capacity)
Tenants
AS Saint-Étienne

Stade Félix-Bollaert

Full name Stade Bollaert-Delelis
Location Lens, France
Coordinates 50°25′58″N 2°48′54″ECoordinates: 50°25′58″N 2°48′54″E
Opened 1933
Capacity 41,229
Tenants
RC Lens

Stadium Municipal

Location Toulouse, France
Coordinates 43°34′59″N 1°26′3″ECoordinates: 43°34′59″N 1°26′3″E
Opened 1937
Renovated 1998
Owner Mairie de Toulouse
Surface Grass
Capacity 35,472
Tenants
Toulouse FC

Allianz Riviera

Grand Stade Nice under construction in November 2012
Broke ground July 2011
Opened September 2013
Owner City of Nice
Surface grass
Construction cost € 245 million
Architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte
Project manager Vinci
Capacity 35,624
Tenants
OGC Nice
2013 Jeux de la Francophonie
UEFA Euro 2016

Euro Cup 2016 Match Officials

Country Referee Assistant referees Additional assistant referees Matches refereed
Czech Republic Pavel Královec      
England Martin Atkinson      
England Mark Clattenburg      
France Clément Turpin      
Germany Felix Brych      
Hungary Viktor Kassai      
Italy Nicola Rizzoli      
Netherlands Björn Kuipers      
Norway Svein Oddvar Moen      
Poland Szymon Marciniak      
Romania Ovidiu Hațegan      
Russia Sergei Karasev      
Scotland Willie Collum      
Serbia Milorad Mažić      
Slovenia Damir Skomina      
Spain Carlos Velasco Carballo      
Sweden Jonas Eriksson      
Turkey Cüneyt Çakır    

UEFA European Championship Records

by Team

Most tournament wins in Championship: 3 - Germany in year 1972, 1980, 1996, Spain in year 1964, 2008, 2012.

Most finishes in the top two: 6 - Germany in year 1972, 1976, 1980, 1992, 1996, 2008, 4 - Soviet Union in year 1960, 1964, 1972, 1988, Spain in year 1964, 1984, 2008, 2012.

Most finishes in the top four: 8 times - Germany in year 1972, 1976, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2008, 2012, 6 - Russia in year 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1988, 2008 and 4 - France in year 1960, 1984, 1996, 2000, Portugal in year 1984, 2000, 2004, 2012, Spain in year 1964, 1984, 2008, 2012

Most finishes in the top eight: 11 - Spain in year 1960, 1964, 1968, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2008, 2012, 9 - France in year 1960, 1964, 1968, 1984, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2012, Germany in year 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2008, 2012, 8 - England in year 1968, 1972, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2004, 2012, Netherlands in year 1976, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, Russia in year 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1988, 1992, 2008.

Most Final appearances: 11 - Germany (since 1972)
Most second-place finishes: 3 - Germany in year 1976, 1992, 2008, Soviet Union in year 1964, 1972, 1988
Most third/fourth-place finishes: 3 - Czech Republic in year 1960, 1980, 2004, Portugal in year 1984, 2000, 2012
Most 5th-8th-place finishes: 7 - Spain in year 1960, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1988, 1996, 2000

Most consecutive championships titles: 2 - Spain in year 2008–2012in year

Most consecutive finishes in the top two: 3 - West Germany in year 1972–1980
Most consecutive finishes in the top four: 4 - Soviet Union in year 1960–1972
Most consecutive finishes in the top eight: 7 - Germany in year 1972–1996in year
Most consecutive finals tournaments: 11 - Germany in year 1972–2012in year
Longest gap between successive titles: 44 yrs - Spain (1964–2008)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top two: 32 years - Italy (1968–2000)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top four: 28 years - England (1968–1996)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top eight: 28 years - Sweden (1964–1992)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the Finals: 24 years - France in year 1960–1984, Greece in year 1980–2004, Republic of Ireland in year 1988–2012.
Best finish by host team: Spain in year 1964, Italy in year 1968, France in year 1984.
Worst finish by host team: 9th-16th position - Belgium in year 2000, Austria in year 2008, Switzerland in year 2008, Poland in year 2012, Ukraine in year 2012in year
Best finish by defending champion: Spain in year 2012
Worst finish by defending champion not qualified and finished outside top eight: France in year 1988
Worst finish by defending champion qualified and finished outside top eight: Denmark in year 1996, Germany in year 2000, Greece in year 2008in year
Best finish by a debuting team: Soviet Union in year 1960, Spain in year 1964, Italy in year 1968, West Germany in year 1972.
Most finishes in the top two without not winner in the championship: 2 - Yugoslavia in year 1960, 1968
Most finishes in the top four not winner in the championship: 4 - Portugal in year 1984, 2000, 2004, 2012
Most finishes in the top eight not winner in the championship: 8 - England in year 1968, 1972, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2004, 2012
Most appearances in Finals not winner in the championship: 8 - England in year 1968, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2012
Most finishes in the top four without ever finishing in the top two: 2 - England in year 1968, 1996, Hungary in year 1964, 1972
Most finishes in the top eight without ever finishing in the top two: 8 - England in year 1968, 1972, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2004, 2012
Most appearances in Finals without ever finishing in the top two: 8 - England in year 1968, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2012
Most finishes in the top eight without ever finishing in the top four: 4 - Romania in year 1960, 1972, 1984, 2000
Most appearances in Finals without ever finishing in the top four: 4 - Croatia in year 1996, 2004, 2008, 2012, Romania in year 1984, 1996, 2000, 2008
Progressed from the first round the most times in year since 1980: 6 - Germany in year 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2008, 2012, Netherlands in year 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008
Eliminated in the first round the most times in year since 1980 : 4 - Denmark in year 1988, 1996, 2000, 2012, England in year 1980, 1988, 1992, 2000, Russia in year 1992, 1996, 2004, 2012
Most appearances, always progressing from the first round in year since 1980 : 6 - Portugal in year 1984, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012
Most appearances, never progressing from the first round in year since 1980 : 3 - Switzerland in year 1996, 2004, 2008
Most consecutive progressions from the first round in year since 1980 : 6 - Netherlands in year 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008
Most consecutive eliminations from the first round: 2 - England in year 1988–1992, Russia in year 1992–1996, Scotland in year 1992–1996, Denmark in year 1996–2000, Germany in year 2000–2004, Switzerland in year 2004–2008, Poland in year 2008–2012, Sweden in year 2008–2012

Most matches played: 43 - Germany
Most wins: 23 - Germany
Most losses: - 14 - Denmark
Most draws: 15 - Italy
Most matches played without a win: 6 - Poland
Most matches played before first win: 8 - Romania, Switzerland
Most meetings between two teams: 5 times - Czech Republic vs Germany in year 1976, 1980, 1996(twice), 2004, Germany vs Netherlands in year 1980, 1988, 1992, 2004, 2012, Italy vs Spain in year 1980, 1988, 2008, 2012 (twice)
Most meetings between two teams, final match: 2 times - Czech Republic vs Germany in year 1976, 1996
Most tournaments unbeaten: 4 - Germany in year 1972, 1976, 1980, 1996, Spain in year 1964, 1996, 2008, 2012
Most tournaments eliminated without having lost a match: 2 - England in year 1996, 2012, Italy in year 1980, 2004, Netherlands in year 1992, 2000
Most tournaments eliminated without having won a match in year (since 1980): 3 - Denmark in year 1988, 1996, 2000, Romania in year 1984, 1996, 2008

Most wins in one tournament: 5 - France (1984, out of 5, 2000, out of 6), Spain (2008, out of 6)

Fewest wins, champions in year since 1980: 2 - Denmark (1992, out of 5)
Most matches not won: 3 - Denmark in year 1992, out of 5
Most wins by non-champion: 4 - Italy in year 2000, out of 6, Netherlands in year 2000, out of 5, Czech Republic in year 2004, out of 5, Germany in year 2008, out of 6, Germany in year 2012, out of 5
Most matches not won: 4 - Czech Republic in year 1996, out of 6, Netherlands in year 2004, out of 5, Italy in year 2012, out of 6in year
Most losses: 3 - Yugoslavia in year 1984, Denmark in year 1988, England in year 1988, Romania in year 1996, Turkey in year 1996, Denmark in year 2000, Bulgaria in year 2004, Greece in year 2008, Netherlands in year 2012, Republic of Ireland in year 2012
Most losses champions: 1 - Netherlands in year 1988, Denmark in year 1992, France in year 2000, Greece in year 2004

by Goals

Most goals scored: 65 - Germany
Most goals conceded: 45 - Germany
Fewest goals scored: 1 - Austria, Latvia, Norway
Fewest goals conceded: 1 - Norway
Most matches played always conceding a goal: 6 - Poland
Highest average of goals scored per match: 1.63 - Netherlands
Lowest average of goals scored per match: 0.33 - Austria, Latvia, Norway
Highest average of goals conceded per match: 2.79 - Yugoslavia
Lowest average of goals conceded per match: 0.33 - Norway (1 goal in 3 matches)

Most goals scored: 14 - France in year 1984in year
Fewest goals conceded: 1 - Italy in year 1980, Norway in year 2000, Spain in year 2012
Most goals conceded: 13 - Yugoslavia in year 2000
Most minutes without conceding a goal: 509 mins - Spain in year 2012
Highest goal difference: +11 - Spain in year 2012
Lowest goal difference: -8 - Yugoslavia in year 1984, Denmark in year 2000, Bulgaria in year 2004, Republic of Ireland in year 2012
Lowest goal difference, champions: +2 - Spain in year 1964, Italy in year 1968, Czechoslovakia in year 1976, Denmark in year 1992
Highest average of goals scored per match: 2.8 - France in year 1984
Highest average goal difference per match (since 1980): +2, France in year 1984
Most goals scored, champions: 14 - France in year 1984
Fewest goals scored, champions (since 1980): 6 - West Germany in year 1980, Denmark in year 1992
Fewest goals scored, finalists (since 1980): 4 - Belgium in year 1980
Fewest goals conceded, champions (since 1980): 1 - Spain in year 2012
Most goals conceded, champions: 7 - France in year 2000
Lowest average of goals scored per match: 1.17 - Greece in year 2004

Streaks

Most consecutive successful qualification attempts: 6 - France in year 1992–2012, Germany in year 1992–2012.
Most consecutive failed qualification attempts: 13 - Luxembourg, Northern Ireland, Wales (1964–2012)
Most consecutive wins: 5 - France (from 1–0 Denmark (1984) to 2–0 Spain (1984)), Netherlands (from 3–1 England (1988) to 1–0 Scotland (1992))
Most consecutive matches without a loss: 12 – Spain (from 4–1 Russia in year 2008 to 4–0 Italy in year 2012)
Most consecutive losses: 6 - Yugoslavia (from 0–2 Italy in year 1968 to 2–3 France in year 1984)
Most consecutive matches without a win L 9 - Soviet Union / CIS / Russia (from 0–2 Netherlands in year 1988 to 0–2 Portugal in year 2004)
Most consecutive draws: 3 - Italy (from 0–0 Belgium in year 1980 to 1–1 West Germany in year 1988), Sweden (from 1–1 Italy in year 2004 to 0–0 Netherlands in year 2004), Italy (from 0–0 Spain in year 2008 to 1–1 Croatia in year 2012)
Most consecutive matches without a draw: 16 - Czech Republic(from 1–2 Germany in year 1996 to 0–1 Portugal in year 2012)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least one goal: 11- England (from 1–1 Germany in year 1996 to 1–0 Ukraine in year 2012)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least two goals: 9 - France (from 3–0 Denmark in year 2000 to 3–1 Switzerland in year 2004)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least three goals: 3 - France (from 5–0 Belgium in year 1984 to 3–2 Portugal in year 1984), Netherlands (from 3–0 Denmark in year 2000 to 6–1 Yugoslavia in year 2000)
Most consecutive matches without scoring a goal: 4 - Denmark(from 0–2 West Germany in year 1988 to 0–1 Sweden in year 1992), Switzerland (from 0–2 Netherlands in year 1996 to 0–3 England in year 2004), Denmark (from 0–3 France in year 2000in year to 0–0 Italy in year 2004)
Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal: 5, Spain, from 4–0 Republic of Ireland (2012) to 4–0 Italy (2012)
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal: 509, Spain (2012)
Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal (including qualifying): 8, Italy, from 0–0 Poland (1975) to 0–0 Belgium (1980)
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (including qualifying): 784, Italy (1975–1980)
Most consecutive matches conceding at least one goal: 10, Romania, from 1–1 Spain (1984) to 0–2 Italy (2000)
Most consecutive matches conceding at least two goals: 7, Yugoslavia, from 0–2 Italy (1968) to 3–3 Slovenia (2000)
Most consecutive matches conceding at least three goals: 3, Yugoslavia, from 0–5 Denmark (1984) to 3–3 Slovenia (2000), Czech Republic, from 1–3 Portugal (2008) to 1–4 Russia (2012)

by Individual

Most tournaments played: 4 goals by

  • Lothar Matthäus (Germany Germany, 1980–1988, 2000)
  • Peter Schmeichel (Denmark Denmark, 1988–2000)
  • Aron Winter (Netherlands Netherlands, 1988–2000)
  • Alessandro del Piero (Italy Italy, 1996–2008)
  • Edwin van der Sar (Netherlands Netherlands, 1996–2008)
  • Lilian Thuram (France France, 1996–2008)
  • Olof Mellberg (Sweden Sweden, 2000–2012)
  • Iker Casillas (Spain Spain, 2000–2012)

Most championships:

2 - Xabi Alonso, Iker Casillas, Cesc Fabregas, Andrés Iniesta, Sergio Ramos, David Silva, Fernando Torres, Xavi ( Spain, 2008–2012); Álvaro Arbeloa, Santi Cazorla ( Spain, 2008–2012); Rainer Bonhof ( West Germany, 1972,1980) and Raúl Albiol, Pepe Reina ( Spain, 2008–2012)

Most matches played, Finals:

16, Edwin van der Sar (Netherlands Netherlands, 1996–2008), Lilian Thuram (France France, 1996–2008)

Most minutes played, Finals:

1535 minutes, Edwin van der Sar ( Netherlands, 1996–2008)

Most matches won:

9, Lilian Thuram & Zinédine Zidane ( France, 1996–2004); Edwin van der Sar ( Netherlands, 1996–2008); Nuno Gomes ( Portugal, 2000–2008); Xabi Alonso, Iker Casillas & Fernando Torres ( Spain, 2004–2012); Cesc Fàbregas & Andrés Iniesta ( Spain, 2008–2012)

Most appearances in a final:

2, Valentin Ivanov, Viktor Ponedelnik & Lev Yashin ( Soviet Union, 1960 & 1964); Franz Beckenbauer, Uli Hoeneß, Sepp Maier, Georg Schwarzenbeck & Herbert Wimmer ( West Germany, 1972 & 1976); Bernard Dietz ( West Germany, 1976 & 1980); Thomas Häßler, Thomas Helmer, Jürgen Klinsmann & Matthias Sammer ( Germany, 1992 & 1996); Xabi Alonso, Iker Casillas, Cesc Fàbregas, Andrés Iniesta, Sergio Ramos, David Silva, Fernando Torres & Xavi ( Spain, 2008 & 2012)

Most appearances as captain:

11, Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2008–2012)

Youngest player: Jetro Willems at age of 18 years ( Netherlands, vs Denmark, 2012)
Youngest player, final: Cristiano Ronaldo at age of 19 years ( Portugal, vs Greece, 2004)
Youngest player, winning team: Pietro Anastasi at age of 20 years ( Italy, vs Yugoslavia, 1968)
Oldest player: Lothar Matthäus at age of 39 years ( Germany, vs Portugal, 20 June 2000)
Oldest player, final: Jens Lehmann at age of 38 years ( Germany, vs Spain, 2008)
Oldest player, winning team: Arnold Mühren at age of 37 years( Netherlands, vs West Germany, 1988)
Largest age difference on a champion team: Netherlands at age of 13 years 1988, (Arnold Mühren: 37 years and 54 days; Marco van Basten: 23 years and 238 days)
Longest period between Finals appearances: Dragan Stojković at age of 15 years ( Yugoslavia, 1984–2000).
Longest span of Finals appearances: Lothar Matthäus at age of 20 years( Germany, 1980–2000)

by Goalscoring

Most goals scored, Finals:
9, Michel Platini ( France, 1984

Most goals scored, including qualifying: 21, Jan Koller ( Czech Republic: 6 in 2000, 8 in 2004, 7 in 2008), Jon Dahl Tomasson ( Denmark: 6 in 2000, 8 in 2004, 7 in 2008), Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal: 2 in 2004, 9 in 2008, 10 in 2012)

Most goals scored in a tournament:
9, Michel Platini ( France, 1984)

Most goals scored in a match:
3, on 8 occasions

Most goals scored in a qualifying match:

5, Malcolm Macdonald ( England, 5–0 vs Cyprus, 16 April 1975); Tibor Nyilasi ( Hungary, 8–1 vs Luxembourg, 19 October 1975); Marco van Basten ( Netherlands, 8–0 vs Malta, 19 December 1990)

Most goals scored in one final: 2, Gerd Müller ( West Germany vs Soviet Union, 1972); Horst Hrubesch ( West Germany vs Belgium, 1980); Oliver Bierhoff ( Germany vs Czech Republic, 1996)

Most matches with at least one goal:
6, Alan Shearer ( England, 1996–2000)

Most consecutive matches with at least one goal:
5, Michel Platini ( France, 1984)

Most matches with at least two goals:

2, Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 1972); Michel Platini ( France, 1984); Rudi Völler ( West Germany, 1984 & 1988); Wayne Rooney ( England, 2004)

Most consecutive matches with at least two goals:
2, Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 1972); Michel Platini ( France, 1984); Wayne Rooney ( England, 2004)

Most hat-tricks:
2, Michel Platini ( France, 1984)

Most consecutive hat-tricks:
2, Michel Platini ( France, 1984)

Fastest hat-trick:
18 minutes, Michel Platini ( France vs Yugoslavia, 1984)

Most goals scored by a substitute in a match:
3, Dieter Müller ( West Germany vs Yugoslavia, 1976)

Scoring in every match of the Finals:
Viktor Ponedelnik ( Soviet Union, 2 goals in 2 matches, 1960); Jesús María Pereda ( Spain, 2 goals in 2 matches, 1964); Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 4 goals in 2 matches, 1972); Dieter Müller ( West Germany, 4 goals in 2 matches, 1976); Michel Platini ( France, 9 goals in 5 matches, 1984)

Most tournaments with at least one goal:
3, Jürgen Klinsmann, ( Germany, 1988–1996); Vladimír Šmicer ( Czech Republic, 1996–2004); Thierry Henry ( France, 2000–2008); Nuno Gomes ( Portugal, 2000–2008); Hélder Postiga ( Portugal, 2004–2012); Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004–2012); Zlatan Ibrahimović ( Sweden, 2004–2012)

Most tournaments with at least two goals:
3, Zlatan Ibrahimović ( Sweden, 2004–2012)

Youngest goalscorer:
18 years and 141 days, Johan Vonlanthen ( Switzerland vs France, 2004)

Youngest hat-trick scorer:
22 years and 77 days, Dieter Müller ( Germany vs Yugoslavia, 1976)

Youngest goalscorer, final:
20 years and 64 days, Pietro Anastasi ( Italy vs Yugoslavia, 1968)

Oldest goalscorer:

38 years and 257 days, Ivica Vastić ( Austria vs Poland, 2008)[11]

Oldest hat-trick scorer:
28 years and 364 days, Michel Platini ( France vs Yugoslavia, 1984)

Oldest goalscorer, final
30 years, 103 days, Bernd Hölzenbein ( West Germany vs Czechoslovakia, 1976)

Most penalties scored (excluding penalty shoot-outs):
2, Alan Shearer ( England, one in 1996, one in 2000); Gaizka Mendieta ( Spain, two in 2000); Zinédine Zidane ( France, one in 2000, one in 2004)

Fastest goal:
68 seconds, Dmitri Kirichenko ( Russia vs Greece, 2004)

Fastest goal by a substitute:
< 1 minute, Alessandro Altobelli ( Italy vs Denmark, 1988); Juan Carlos Valeron ( Spain vs Russia, 2004)

Fastest goal in a final:
6 minutes, Jesús María Pereda ( Spain vs Soviet Union, 1964)

Latest goal from kickoff:
120th minute, Semih Şentürk ( Turkey vs Croatia, 2008)

Latest goal from kickoff in a final:
113th minute, Viktor Ponedelnik ( Soviet Union vs Yugoslavia 1960)

Latest goal from kickoff, with no goals scored in between:
117th minute, Ivan Klasnić ( Croatia vs Turkey, 2008)

Team

Biggest margin of victory:
5, France (5) vs Belgium (0), 1984; Denmark (5) vs Yugoslavia (0), 1984; Netherlands (6) vs Yugoslavia (1), 2000; Sweden (5) vs Bulgaria (0), 2004[2]

Biggest margin of victory, qualifying match:
13, Germany (13) vs San Marino (0), September 6, 2006, Group 4

Most goals scored in a match, one team:
6, Netherlands, vs Yugoslavia, 2000

Most goals scored in a match, both teams:
9, Yugoslavia (5) vs France (4), 1960

Highest scoring draw:
3–3, Czech Republic vs Russia, 1996; Slovenia vs Yugoslavia, 2000

Largest deficit overcome in a win:
2 goals, Yugoslavia, 1960 (coming from 1–3 and 2–4 down to win 5–4 vs France); West Germany, 1976 (coming from 0–2 down to win 4–2 after extra time vs Yugoslavia); Denmark, 1984 (coming from 0–2 down to win 3–2 vs Belgium); Czech Republic, 2004 (coming from 0-2 down to win 3-2 vs Netherlands); Turkey, 2008 (coming from 0–2 down to win 3–2 vs Czech Republic)

Largest deficit overcome in a draw:
3 goals, Yugoslavia, 2000 (coming from 0–3 down to draw 3–3 vs Slovenia)

Most goals scored in extra time, both teams:
3, France (3) vs Portugal (2), 1984

Most goals scored in a final, one team:
4, Spain, 2012

Most goals scored in a final, both teams:
4, Czech Republic (2) vs West Germany (2), 1976; Italy (0) vs Spain (4), 2012

Fewest goals scored in a final, both teams:
1, Greece (1) vs Portugal (0), 2004; Spain (1) vs Germany (0), 2008

Biggest margin of victory in a final:
4, Spain (4) vs Italy (0), 2012

Largest deficit overcome in a win in a final:
1, Soviet Union, 1960 (coming from 0–1 down to win 2–1 after extra time vs Yugoslavia); Germany, 1996 (coming from 0–1 down to win 2–1 after extra time vs Czech Republic); France, 2000 (coming from 0–1 down to win 2–1 after extra time vs Italy)

Most individual goalscorers for one team, one match:
4, Yugoslavia vs France, 1960 (Milan Galić, Ante Žanetić, Tomislav Knez, Dražan Jerković); Denmark vs Yugoslavia, 1984 (Frank Arnesen, Klaus Berggreen, Preben Elkjaer-Larsen, John Lauridsen); Sweden vs Bulgaria, 2004 (Fredrik Ljungberg, Henrik Larsson, Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Marcus Allbäck); Germany vs Greece, 2012 (Philipp Lahm, Sami Khedira, Miroslav Klose, Marco Reus); Spain vs Italy, 2012 (David Silva, Jordi Alba, Fernando Torres, Juan Mata)

Most individual goalscorers for one team, one tournament:
8, Germany, 2012 (Mario Gómez, Lukas Podolski, Lars Bender, Philipp Lahm, Sami Khedira, Miroslav Klose, Marco Reus, Mesut Özil)

Tournament

Most goals scored in a tournament:
85 goals, 2000

Fewest goals scored in a tournament:
7 goals, 1968

Fewest goals scored in a tournament (since 1980):
27 goals, 1980

Most goals per match in a tournament:
4.75 goals per match, 1976

Most goals per match in a tournament (since 1980):
2.74 goals per match, 2000

Fewest goals per match in a tournament:
1.4 goals per match, 1968

Fewest goals per match in a tournament (since 1980):
1.93 goals per match, 1980

Most scorers in a tournament
53, 2000, 2008 & 2012

Most players scoring at least two goals in a tournament:
20, 2000

Most players scoring at least three goals in a tournament:
8, 2004

Most players scoring at least four goals in a tournament:
3, 2000 & 2004

Most players scoring at least five goals in a tournament:
2, 2000

by Own goals

  • Anton Ondrus, Czechoslovakia vs Netherlands in year 1976
  • Lyuboslav Penev, Bulgaria vs France in year 1996
  • Dejan Govedarica, Yugoslavia vs Netherlands in year 2000
  • Jorge Andrade, Portugal vs Netherlands in year 2004
  • Glen Johnson, England vs Sweden in year 2012

Top scoring teams by tournament

  • 1960: Yugoslavia, 6 goals
  • 1964: Hungary, Soviet Union & Spain, 4 goals
  • 1968: Italy, 3 goals
  • 1972: West Germany, 5 goals
  • 1976: West Germany, 6 goals
  • 1980: West Germany, 6 goals
  • 1984: France, 14 goals
  • 1988: Netherlands, 8 goals
  • 1992: Germany, 7 goals
  • 1996: Germany, 10 goals
  • 2000: France & Netherlands, 13 goals
  • 2004: Czech Republic & England, 10 goals
  • 2008: Spain, 12 goals
  • 2012: Spain, 12 goals

by Goalkeeping

Most clean sheets (matches without conceding):
9, Edwin van der Sar ( Netherlands, 1996–2008); Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2004–2012)

Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (finals):
509 mins, Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2012)

Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (including qualifying):
784 mins (including 8 consecutive clean sheets), Dino Zoff ( Italy, 1975–1980)

Most goals conceded:
20, Peter Schmeichel ( Denmark, 1988–2000)

Most goals conceded, one tournament:
13, Ivica Kralj ( Yugoslavia), 2000

Most goals conceded, one match:
6, Ivica Kralj ( Yugoslavia), 2000 (vs Netherlands)

Fewest goals conceded, one tournament, champions:
1, Dino Zoff ( Italy, 1968); Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2012)

Fewest goals conceded, one tournament:
1, Dino Zoff ( Italy, 1968); Thomas Myhre ( Norway, 2000); Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2012)

by Coaching

Most matches coached:
11, Berti Vogts ( Germany, 1992–1996); Joachim Löw ( Germany, 2008–2012)

Most matches won:
8, Joachim Löw ( Germany, 2008–2012)

Most championships:
no coach has won the title

Most tournaments:
3, Lars Lagerbäck, ( Sweden, 2000–2008)

Most nations coached:
2, Guus Hiddink ( Netherlands, 1996; Russia, 2008); Giovanni Trapattoni ( Italy, 2004; Republic of Ireland, 2012); Dick Advocaat ( Netherlands, 2004; Russia, 2012)

Most consecutive tournaments with same team:
3, Lars Lagerbäck, ( Sweden, 2000–2008)

Most consecutive wins:
5, Michel Hidalgo ( France, 1984); Rinus Michels ( Netherlands, 1988–1992)

Most consecutive matches without a loss:
8, Rinus Michels ( Netherlands, 1988–1992)

Youngest coach:
36 years and 333 days, Srečko Katanec ( Slovenia vs Yugoslavia, 2000)[13]

Oldest coach:
73 years and 93 days, Giovanni Trapattoni ( Republic of Ireland vs Italy, 2012)[13]

Most championship wins as player and head coach:
2, Berti Vogts, Germany (1972 as non-playing squad member; 1996 as coach)

Most appearances as player and head coach:
14, Morten Olsen, Denmark (1984 & 1988 as player, 2004 & 2012 as coach); Frank Rijkaard, Netherlands (1988 & 1992 as player, 2000 as coach)

Final appearances as both player and head coach:
2, Dino Zoff, Italy (1968 as player, 2000 as coach)

by Penalty shootouts

Most shootouts, team, all-time:
4, England, Netherlands, Spain

Most shootouts, team, tournament:
2, England, 1996; France, 1996

Most shootouts, all teams, tournament:
4, 1996

Most wins, team, all-time:
3, Czech Republic, Spain

Most losses, team, all-time:
3, England, Netherlands

Most shootouts with 100% record (all won):
3, Czech Republic

Most shootouts with 0% record (all lost):
1, Croatia, Sweden

Most successful kicks, shootout, one team:
9 (out of 9), Czech Republic vs Italy, 1980

Most successful kicks, shootout, both teams:
17 (out of 18), Czech Republic vs Italy, 1980

Most successful kicks, team, all-time:
20 (out of 20), Czech Republic

Most successful kicks, player:
2, Zinédine Zidane, Youri Djorkaeff, Bixente Lizarazu, Vincent Guérin, Laurent Blanc ( France, 1996); Alan Shearer, David Platt, Stuart Pearce, Paul Gascoigne ( England, 1996); Patrick Kluivert ( Netherlands, 1996–2000); Cesc Fàbregas ( Spain, 2008–2012)

Most kicks taken, shootout, both teams:
18, Czechoslovakia vs Italy, 1980

Most kicks taken, team, all-time:
20, Czech Republic, England, Netherlands

Most kicks taken, team, one tournament:
11, France, 1996

Most kicks missed, shootout, both teams:
4, Italy vs Netherlands 2000

Most kicks missed, team, all-time:
6, Netherlands (in 4 shootouts)

Fewest successful kicks, shootout, one team:
1, Netherlands vs Italy, 2000; Croatia vs Turkey, 2008

Most saves, all-time:
3, Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2008–2012)